Please arrive 2 hours early for your MR Enterography exam

How do I prepare for the exam?

  • You will be asked to arrive 2 hours prior to your exam.
  • During check-in process you will be asked to fill out the MRI Safety Form, Click Here to view the form.
  • You will be asked to change into a hospital gown and lock up your belongings.
  • You will be asked to fast for 4 hours prior to your exam. You may take your usual medications with small amounts of water. Otherwise, no additional preparation is needed.
  • (MRE) Enterography exams are done in the Main Hospital only. This kind of exam is not done in ACC or Placer Clinics. For directions to the main hospital please click here.

What does the procedure involve?

 

  • Before your exam we will start an IV on you, which is needed for contrast injection during the scan.
  • Before the exam you will be asked to drink approximately 1 liter (3 bottles) of a liquid called Volumen. This will help distend the bowel so it can be better visualized during the MRI.
  • During the exam you will be given an injection of contrast fluid called gadolinium. This will be administered through an IV line in your arm, placed at the beginning of the exam.
  • You will also receive a medication called glucagon via injection. This helps to decrease bowel motion which will improve the quality of the images. Please let the radiologist or technologist know if you have pheochromocytoma, insulinoma, or insulin dependent diabetes, as you should not receive glucagon with any of these conditions.
  • If you have any history of renal disease, a blood test will be required within 2 weeks prior to your exam time.

 

There are no restrictions after your exam and you may eat and drink as usual.

How do I prepare for the exam?

  • During check-in process you will be asked to fill out the MRI Safety Form, Click Here to view the form.
  • You will be asked to change into a hospital gown and lock up your belongings.
  • You will be asked to fast for 4 hours prior to your exam. You may take your usual medications with small amounts of water. Otherwise, no additional preparation is needed.
  • These exams are done in the Main Hospital, ACC or Placer Clinics. If you do not know where your exam is scheduled, please call scheduling line at (916) 734-0655

What does the procedure involve?

  • These exams require an injection of contrast fluid called gadolinium, unless contraindicated by underlying medical issues.
  • Before your exam we will start an IV on you, which is needed for this contrast injection during the scan.
  • If you have any history of renal disease, a blood test will be required within 2 weeks prior to your exam time.

How do I prepare for the exam?

  • During check-in process you will be asked to fill out the MRI Safety Form, Click Here to view the form.
  • You will be asked to change into a hospital gown and lock up your belongings.
  • You will be asked to fast for 4 hours prior to your exam. You may take your usual medications with small amounts of water. Otherwise, no additional preparation is needed.
  • Most pelvis MRI exams are done in the Main Hospital, ACC or Placer Clinics. However, some specialized pelvis MRI exams are only done in the Main Hospital. If you do not know where your exam is scheduled, please call scheduling line at (916) 734-0655
  • If you are scheduled for Prostate MRI, please click here.

What does the procedure involve?

  • These exams require an injection of contrast fluid called gadolinium, unless contraindicated by underlying medical issues.
  • Before your exam we will start an IV on you, which is needed for this contrast injection during the scan.
  • If you have any history of renal disease, a blood test will be required within 2 weeks prior to your exam time.
  • For some pelvis MRI exams, the administration of endo-rectal or endo-vaginal ultrasound gel using a catheter is also required. The exams requiring this gel administration will only be performed at the Main Hospital.

Patient prepared for Abdomen and Pelvis MRI

Patient undergoing Abdomen and Pelvis MRI