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UC Davis Transplant Center

UC Davis Transplant Center

Matching and Compatibility

You may have heard discussions about “matching” and kidney transplantation. There are actually three tests that are done to evaluate donors. They are blood type, crossmatch, and HLA testing. This blood test is the first step in the process of living donation and determines if you are compatible or a “match” to your recipient.

Blood Typing
There are 4 different blood types. The most common blood type in the population is type O. The next most common is blood type A, then B, and the rarest is blood type AB. The blood type of the donor must be compatible with the recipient. The rules for blood type in transplantation are the same as they are for blood transfusion. Some blood types can give to others and some may not. Blood type O is considered the universal donor. People with blood type O can give to any other blood type. Blood type AB is called the universal recipient because they can receive an organ or blood from people with any blood type. The chart below shows which blood type can donate to which.

If your blood type is:  You can donate to these blood types:
TYPE O TYPE O, A, B, AB
TYPE A TYPE A, AB
TYPE B TYPE B, AB
TYPE AB TYPE AB

 

HLA Typing
HLA typing is also called “tissue typing”. HLA stands for human leukocyte antigen. Antigens are proteins on the cells in the body. Out of over 100 different antigens that have been identified, there are six that have been shown to be the most important in organ transplantation. Of these six antigens, we inherit three from each parent.

Except in cases of identical twins and some siblings, it is rare to get a six-antigen match between two people, especially if they are unrelated.  The chance of a perfect or six-antigen match between two unrelated people is about one in 100,000.  Kidneys are commonly transplanted between two people with no matching antigens without a rejection episode. In other cases where all six antigens matched, recipients have suffered from rejection. There is no way to predict who will experience a rejection episode. Living donors with a 6 antigen match do allow the opportunity for decreased immunosuppression.

 

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