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December 2016arrow

Healthy weight only protects women from hot flashes during the early stages of menopause

December 6, 2016

Greater weight increases the likelihood of hot flashes and night sweats during early stages of the menopause transition but reduces those symptoms throughout menopause and beyond, new UC Davis research published in the journal Menopause shows.

November 2016arrow

Gram-negative bacteria may influence Alzheimer's disease pathology

November 29, 2016

For the first time, researchers have found higher levels of Gram-negative bacteria antigens in brain samples from late-onset Alzheimer’s disease patients. Compared to controls, patients with Alzheimer's had much higher levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and E coli K99 pili protein. In addition, The UC Davis team also found LPS molecules congregated with amyloid plaques, which have been linked to Alzheimer’s pathology and progression. The research was published today in the print edition of the journal Neurology.

Alarming health disparities could be prevented by breastfeeding

November 23, 2016

Black infants had over twice the deaths of whites attributable to lack of optimal breastfeeding, a new study published in the Journal of Pediatrics shows. Black infants also had over three times the rate of necrotizing enterocolitis, a devastating disease of preterm infants, attributable to suboptimal rates of feeding with their mother’s own milk.

Mobile health data may offer new pathways to better patient care

November 15, 2016

A UC Davis-led team has been awarded a $1.2 million grant from California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine (CIAPM) to explore the use of personalized mobile health data to improve chronic disease management and care.

October 2016arrow

Terminally ill cancer patients fare poorly after surgery

October 25, 2016

Patients with disseminated advanced cancer who undergo surgery are far more likely to endure long hospital stays and readmissions, referrals to extended care facilities and death, UC Davis researchers have found.

New grants help UC Davis researchers home in on Angelman syndrome treatment

October 20, 2016

Two UC Davis researchers have received grants totaling $1.6 million to advance their work to find an effective treatment for Angelman syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that causes seizures and sleep disturbances and inhibits language development.

Sexual pain in women after cancer is common, and too often ignored

October 20, 2016

Painful sex in women after cancer treatment is relatively common, often treatable and needs to be addressed by medical providers, a UC Davis oncologist and researcher suggests.

Neu5Gc in red meat and organs may pose a significant health hazard

October 19, 2016

Neu5Gc, a non-human sialic acid sugar molecule common in red meat that increases the risk of tumor formation in humans, is also prevalent in pig organs, with concentrations increasing as the organs are cooked, a study by researchers from the UC Davis School of Medicine and Xiamen University School of Medicine has found.

NIH Precision Medicine Initiative Cohort Program Expands in California

October 13, 2016

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has named the California Precision Medicine Consortium as a regional medical center group in the national network of health care provider organizations that will implement the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) Cohort Program.

High sialic acid levels in organ meats may pose significant health hazard

October 12, 2016

Researchers at UC Davis and the Xiamen University School of Medicine have found that a dangerous family of molecules called sialic acids (SIAs) are prevalent in piglet organs, with concentrations increasing as the organs are cooked. Of particular concern, a SIA called Neu5Gc was prevalent in piglet spleens and lungs. SIAs have been linked to cancer, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. The research was published in the Glycoconjugate Journal Sept. 9.

Preserving the power of antibiotics

October 6, 2016

Of the 10 million prescriptions for antibiotics that emergency department physicians in the U.S. write each year, many are prescribed for known viral infections such as acute bronchitis and upper respiratory infections, which do not respond to antibiotics. A one-year study at UC Davis Medical Center funded with a grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working to reduce inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and preserve the microbe-fighting power of antibiotics.  

30-day hospital readmission is a poor measure of quality

October 4, 2016

The 30-day window for hospital readmissions — used by the federal government to penalize hospitals believed to provide lower-quality care because patients return to the hospital following discharge — should be reduced to a week or less to more accurately measure factors within a hospital’s control, new research from UC Davis has found.

UC Davis surgeons enroll the first patient in an acute spinal cord injury study

October 3, 2016

Neurosurgeons at UC Davis Health System have enrolled the first patient in a study that will determine if a new investigational treatment can safely and effectively improve motor function following acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury.