NEWS | August 31, 2018

Providing convenient and free health services

Student-run clinics offer care where there is none

(SACRAMENTO)

For more than 45 years, UC Davis School of Medicine students have operated clinics in inner city neighborhoods of Sacramento, providing free and convenient care to uninsured, low-income and other medically underserved populations.

student run clinic
A medical student consults with her patient in a student-run clinic.

The clinics also give UC Davis medical, nursing and undergraduate students direct experiences in patient care and community medicine under the direction of licensed physicians. For second-year student Kimberly Ngo, whose parents are Vietnamese refugees, the opportunity to serve her community drew her to medicine and UC Davis.

“We are the only option for culturally and linguistically competent care for many patients, and I wanted to be a part of that,” said Ngo, co-director of the Paul Hom Asian Clinic.

For nearly 6,000 people each year, the clinics offer most primary health care services ― from physicals to vaccinations to diabetes management. Larger clinics also offer specialty services such as dermatology, ophthalmology, podiatry and psychiatry.

“We are the only option for culturally and linguistically competent care for many patients, and I wanted to be a part of that.”
— Kimberly Ngo, co-director of the Paul Hom Asian Clinic

The first clinic launched in 1972. Today, there are seven:

Bayanihan Clinic, serving the Filipino community

Clinica Tepatí, serving the Latino community

Imani Clinic, serving the African American community

Joan Viteri Memorial Clinic, serving IV drug users and sex workers

Paul Hom Asian Clinic, serving the Asian community

Shifa Clinic, serving the South Asian and Muslim communities

Willow Clinic, serving the homeless

Satellite clinics also provide health services to the Vietnamese community, the Hmong community, the rural community of Knights Landing and the LGBTQQI community.

While each focuses on a particular patient population, all are available to anyone who needs care. And, Ngo said, they are always open to welcoming new physician volunteers from throughout the region.

Details about each of the clinics, including locations and schedules, are online.