Ralph Adolphs will speak at the MIND Institute ...
NEWS | April 6, 2018

Ralph Adolphs will speak at the MIND Institute as the next Distinguished Lecturer on April 11

(SACRAMENTO)

The UC Davis MIND Institute will host Ralph Adolphs on Wednesday, April 11 as part of the ongoing Distinguished Lecturer Series. He will present “Predicting who you are from looking at your brain” at 4:30 p.m. at the MIND Institute Auditorium, 2825 50th St. in Sacramento. The event is free to the public and no reservations are required, but seating is limited. A 30-minute question-and-answer session will follow the hour-long lecture. 

Stride for Pride
Ralph Adolphs

Adolphs received his Ph.D. from Caltech in 1993 and conducted postdoctoral research with neuroscientist Antonio Damasio. In 2004, he became a faculty member at Caltech, where his research focuses on the neural underpinnings of social behavior. He studies several populations including neurosurgical patients, individuals with rare brain lesions and people with autism spectrum disorder. In 2012, he and his team received a five-year, $10 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to establish the Caltech Conte Center for the Neurobiology of Social Decision Making, where he is now the director. 

During his presentation, Adolphs will discuss use of neuroimaging data, like functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to predict individual differences in intelligence, personality or social functioning. In addition, he will address the use of fMRI to understand how the brain produces cognition and behavior. The two themes are based primarily on fMRI data from neurologically healthy, typically developed people, but can be extended and tested in people with focal brain lesions and people with neurodevelopmental disorders. 

Founded in 1998, the UC Davis MIND Institute is a collaborative international research center committed to the awareness, understanding, prevention, care of and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders. The MIND Institute brings together members of the community including families, educators, physicians, psychologists and scientists who work together to further understand causes, development and best treatments for neurodevelopmental disorders. 

These presentations are intended for both professionals and community members. For more information, contact Gayna Guidici at 916-703-0237 or glguidici@ucdavis.edu. For media inquiries, contact Dorsey Griffith at 916-734-9118 or dgriffith@ucdavis.edu.

The UC Davis MIND Institute in Sacramento, Calif., was founded in 1998 as a unique interdisciplinary research center where families, community leaders, researchers, clinicians and volunteers work together toward a common goal: researching causes, treatments and eventual preventions and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders. The institute has major research efforts in autism, fragile X syndrome, chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Down syndrome. More information about the institute and its Distinguished Lecturer Series, including previous presentations in this series, is available on the Web at mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu.