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Center for Reducing Health Disparities

Center for Reducing Health Disparities

News releases

June 2017arrow

UC Davis Health hosts migrant student workshop

June 20, 2017

UC Davis Health welcomes 145 migrant high school students Sunday, June 25 for a day of tours, talks and opportunities to learn more about medical science from students, fellows and faculty.

Immigrant farmworkers less likely to use SNAP, study shows

June 15, 2017

The federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — formerly known as “food stamps” — that helps low-income individuals and families purchase food is less likely to be used by farmworkers eligible for the benefit who are immigrants, Hispanic, male, childless or residing in California, new research from UC Davis health economists shows.

April 2017arrow

Early cancer deaths linked to being single, living in a poor neighborhood

April 25, 2017

Patients in California hospitals were more likely to die within 60 days of being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia – a cancer of the blood and bone marrow – if they were unmarried, lived in a less-affluent neighborhood or lacked health insurance. The UC Davis study also found that patients treated at a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center were more likely to survive.

Second cancers deadlier in young patients

April 20, 2017

Second cancers in children and adolescents and young adults (AYA) are far deadlier than they are in older adults and may partially account for the relatively poor outcomes of cancer patients ages 15-39 overall, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found.

February 2017arrow

Language barriers may interfere with access to kidney transplantation

February 10, 2017

Language barriers may hinder U.S. kidney transplant candidates’ access to kidney transplantation, according to a new study in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.  Led by a team from Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Health and UC Davis Health, the research suggests that patients who primarily speak a language other than English may face disparities that keep them from completing their kidney transplant evaluations and, ultimately, from receiving a transplant.

January 2017arrow

Faulty DNA error correction genes set stage for familial gastric cancer

January 19, 2017

A large team of researchers from UC Davis and several European and Latin American institutions have identified genetic variations that contribute to familial gastric cancer. These inherited mutations, which affect the PALB2, BRCA1 and RAD51C genes and have been implicated in other cancer types, impair a critical DNA repair mechanism called homologous recombination. These findings could improve preventive care, as well as provide targets for new therapies. The study was published last month in the journal Gastroenterology.

UC Davis and nation's cancer centers jointly endorse updated HPV vaccine recommendations

January 11, 2017

Recognizing a critical need to improve national vaccination rates for the human papillomavirus (HPV), UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center has again united with each of the 69 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers in issuing a joint statement in support of recently revised recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

November 2016arrow

Alarming health disparities could be prevented by breastfeeding

November 23, 2016

Black infants had over twice the deaths of whites attributable to lack of optimal breastfeeding, a new study published in the Journal of Pediatrics shows. Black infants also had over three times the rate of necrotizing enterocolitis, a devastating disease of preterm infants, attributable to suboptimal rates of feeding with their mother’s own milk.

October 2016arrow

Workshop set for young adults with cancer

October 18, 2016

Young adults dealing with the effects of cancer are invited to attend Pushing Past Cancer, a free day of education and motivation, on Saturday, Nov. 5, from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the UC Davis Sacramento campus. The event is open to cancer patients ages 18-40, their support persons and medical professionals.

August 2016arrow

Lay educators help boost colorectal screening rates in Hmong

August 26, 2016

Hmong Americans are more likely to understand the importance of colorectal cancer screening and to get screened when they’re provided information by specially trained Hmong lay health educators, new research from UC Davis has found.