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The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing cultivates academic excellence through immersive, interprofessional and interdisciplinary education. Faculty represent diversity across various fields of expertise, research and personal experience and foster collaboration among other faculty, students and throughout UC Davis. The stories below highlight a few of the school’s educators and their transformative work.


Seeing beyond the person to improve care for people

Migrant teen

The admiration Janice Bell developed for nurses, coupled with her love of research, propelled her to a career in nursing. Her quest to change the way nurses think about health beyond caring for individuals brought her to the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis. Learn how Bell brings her nursing perspective to caring for people and mentors students in the classroom.

Grabbing opportunity, guided by 'the why'

Migrant teen

Katherine Kim learned early in her sophomore year at Harvard College that collaboration and teamwork are crucial to effective research. Driven by the nagging question "Why?" she tapped into the passion that propels her professionally and furthers the mission of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis.

From transplants to technology

Migrant teen

A surgeon focused on general and transplant surgery in Mexico City, Alberto Odor enjoyed providing for people for 25 years. But the allure of computers and the promise of how technology could improve care for entire populations ultimately brought him to UC Davis and the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing.


Finding what drives people toward healthy behavior

Migrant teen

This professor at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis has amassed a wealth of information on the scientific study of behaviors relating to a person’s health and well-being.

Improving health outcomes for women and immigrant populations

Migrant teen

School of Nursing Professor Mary Lou de Leon Siantz devotes her life and research to improving women’s health. Her current research focuses on the well-being of Hispanic immigrant adolescents and identifying what education will inform better outcomes and produce healthy people.

An education that goes beyond diagnosis to understand the person, family and community

Piri Ackerman-Barger

Meet the educator bringing experience in prelicensure programs and dedication to health equity to the proposed Master's Entry Program in Nursing.


Making the case for nursing-home leaders increasing skills for improved care

Elena Siegel

As members of the baby boom generation get older and reach retirement age, they present increasing concerns for the quality and value of nursing-home care. As this "silver tsunami" swells, industry and policy leaders search for ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiencies of long-term care services. Elena Siegel, an assistant professor at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis, investigates critical skill sets needed by nursing-home management teams to influence policy, improve care and reduce costs.

Meet Theresa Harvath

Theresa Harvath

Theresa Harvath is a trailblazer who recognized early in her education and career that health care needed a focus on prevention and rehabilitation. With more than 25 years in nursing education and clinical practice, she now brings that visionary expertise to the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis to sharpen the skills of new, graduate-student nurses and prepare them for new roles emerging in health care.

Meet Elizabeth Rice: Program director embraces relationships to prepare nurse practitioners for the future

Elizabeth Rice

Elizabeth Rice forged her own path as a nurse practitioner seeking to bridge the gap between physical health and mental health. Her career took her from practice, to research and then nursing education before she landed at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis to lead its family nurse practitioner program. Her goal: encourage nurses from diverse pathways to become nurse practitioners.


Meet Jenna Shaw-Battista: Devotion to women’s health drives passion for teaching

Jenna Shaw-Battista

Jenna Shaw-Battista’s desire to become a nurse midwife dates back to when she was only 12 years old. While babysitting for the daughter of a midwife, she listened in on meetings of the Yolo County Association of Midwives mesmerized by the members’ allegiance to women and commitment to community health. Shaw-Battista developed a similar devotion to women’s health and a passion for teaching which brought her to the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis in April 2016.