Clinical research (research involving human subjects) may include the evaluation of therapies, treatments, devices, medications, surgeries, and/or diagnostic tools. The results from clinical research advance the efficacy and safety of new treatments and directly improve patient care and quality of life.

The Division of Infectious Diseases has a research team whom coordinates all clinical research with the Infectious Diseases clinical faculty. In addition to clinical research, the faculty members conduct laboratory research both at the UC Davis Medical Center and on the UC Davis Campus

Each type of clinical research plays an integral part in strengthening our knowledge of certain diseases or conditions. With clinical research, we can implement better techniques to diagnose, treat, and prevent human diseases and conditions.

The majority of clinical research consists of clinical trials, which may be sponsored or funded by physicians, foundations, federal health agencies (such as the National Institutes of Health), pharmaceutical companies, or university grants.

A clinical trial is a study that looks for new ways to prevent, detect, diagnose, and/or treat a disease or condition. Clinical trials are research projects that have two main objectives in mind: patient safety and disease treatment/prevention. Patients are at the forefront of medicine when they choose to be a participant in a clinical trial. Not only are they contributing to the medical and scientific understanding of their disease, but they also have access to the newest treatments.

This type of study observes people or specific outcomes are measured and recorded. Clinical data is typically only collected and there isn’t any experimental treatment. Another term for these types of studies are retrospective reviews or registry study.

These studies help us understand specific diseases and to identify any causal relationships. Participating in these studies provide important information that has the possibility to help future patients.

These studies collect biological samples from volunteers who are either healthy or suffer from a specific condition. Subjects typically do not directly benefit from participation but their participation has the possibility to help future patients.

Clinical research studies are very different from regular medical care. Your primary care physician will diagnose and treat you for an illness or condition. Clinical researchers gather new information to help improve future medical care.

For additional information, contact the research team at hs-IDresearch@ucdavis.edu.

Study Title: A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-blind Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Emtricitabine and Tenofovir Alafenamide (F/TAF) Fixed-Dose Combination Once Daily for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in Men and Transgender Women Who Have Sex with Men and Are at Risk of HIV-1 Infection

  • Study Type: Phase 3, double-blind
  • Purpose: To see if F/TAF is safe and effective for use as pre-exposure Prophylaxis (to prevent) or PrEP to prevent HIV-1 infection in healthy adults.
  • Principal Investigator: David Asmuth, MD
  • Study Contacts: Tammy Yotter, RN at 916-914-6261or Lynell Clancy at 916-914-6320

Study Title: A Multicenter, Case Control Study of a Lateral Flow Assay and Enzyme Immunoassay for Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis

  • Study Type: Basic Research, Diagnostic tool comparison
  • Purpose: This research study will look at how well two laboratory tests work in detecting fungal antigens, which are present in all types of fungus.
  • Principal Investigator: George Thompson, MD
  • Study Contact: Kate Conant —ph: 916-734-8033 email: ktconant@ucdavis.edu

Study Title: A Phase 2, Multicenter, Randomized, Double-blind Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of CD101 Injection vs Intravenous Caspofungin Followed by Oral Fluconazole Step-down in the Treatment of Subjects with Candidemia

  • Study Type: Phase 2, double-blind
  • Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability and overall success of CD101 in subjects with candidemia.
  • Principal Investigator: George Thompson, MD
  • Study Contact: Kate Conant —ph: 916-734-8033 email: ktconant@ucdavis.edu

Study Title: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Active Comparator-Controlled Clinical Trial to Study the Safety, Tolerability, and Efficacy of Imipenem/Cilastatin/Relebactam (MK-7655A) Versus Piperacillin/Tazobactam in Subjects with Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia or Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia

  • Study Type: Phase 3, double-blind
  • Purpose: The primary objective of this study is to compare the incidence rate of all-cause mortality of IMI/REL to PIP/TAZ in subjects diagnosed with HABP/VABP (Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia/Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia).
  • Principal Investigator: Hien Nguyen, MD
  • Study Contact: Kate Conant —ph: 916-734-8033 email: ktconant@ucdavis.edu

Study Title:  A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter, Phase 3 Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of Intravenous Ceftolozane/Tazobactam Compared with Meropenem in Adult Patients with Ventilated Nosocomial Pneumonia

  • Study Type: Phase 3, double-blind
  • Purpose: The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate the non-inferiority of ceftolozane/tazobactam versus meropenem in adult subjects with ventilated nosocomial pneumonia.
  • Principal Investigator: Hien Nguyen, MD
  • Study Contact: Kate Conant – ph: 916-734-8033; email: ktconant@ucdavis.edu