Kristin Hoffman, M.D., conducts a telehealth session.Our research focuses on how telehealth and connected health programs can:

  • Improve patient outcomes.

  • Increase patient access to care, especially in rural or underserved communities.

  • Make health care more cost effective.

  • Boost both patient and clinician satisfaction.

  • Improve overall quality of care.

Here are some of our active research projects led by UC Davis Health faculty, staff and faculty collaborators.

Tele-Behavioral Health for American Indians Affected by Mental Illness (Tele-AIMI)
Principal Investigators: James Marcin, M.D., MPH; and Peter Yellowlees, M.D., MBBS
Co-Investigators: Murat Pakyurek, M.D.; Bibiana Restrepo, M.D.; and Jeffrey Hoch, Ph.D
Funding Agencies: Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, Office for the Advancement of Telehealth
Award: $1,049,960
Period: September 1, 2018 to August 31, 2021
Researchers are partnering with five rural Indian Health Services clinics that are currently part of UC Davis’ existing rural network to evaluate the impact of adult and pediatric tele-behavioral health consultations on patient-centered outcomes. The study also addresses the economic efficiency of tele-behavioral health consultations.

Use of Home-Based Telemedicine to Improve Healthcare Utilization and Outcomes in Pediatric Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes 
Principal Investigator: Stephanie Crossen, M.D., MPH
Co-Investigators: Nicole Glaser, M.D.; and James Marcin, M.D., MPH
Funding Agencies: UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC) KL2 Program
Award: $307,061
Period: October 1, 2017 to May 31, 2019
The overarching goal of this project is to determine whether telehealth interventions for pediatric patients with diabetes can ultimately help reduce A1C levels. Patients receive telehealth visits every four to eight weeks depending on their A1C levels. Before each visit, the patient sends their glucose meter data electronically to the physician for evaluation. This project also looks at the time and cost-savings involved in providing telehealth visits versus traditional in-person visits.  

School-Based Tele-Physiatry Assistance for Rehabilitative and Therapeutic Services (STARS)  
Principal Investigators: James Marcin, M.D., MPH
Co-Investigator: Loren Davidson, M.D.; Maya Evans, M.D.; and Shawna Arsenault, M.D.
Funding Agency: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Award: $2 million
Period: September 1, 2017 to August 31, 2022
This program provides critical physiatry care for children with cerebral palsy, spina bifida, spinal cord injuries and other disabilities using telehealth. It involves installing secure teleconferencing equipment in schools in San Joaquin, Butte, Mendocino, Lodi and Fresno counties. Physiatrists remotely guide screening and write the appropriate prescriptions and referrals. In addition to providing care, the grant also supports research to determine which approaches provide the greatest benefit for children and their families. The study examines three cohorts: physiatrists providing care in person; non-physiatrists providing care in person; and physiatrists using telemedicine. The group will assess whether telehealth improves quality of care, increases patient-centeredness and reduces costs.

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Transport of Acutely Ill and Injured Children to Institutions of Higher Care for Allied Localities (TACTICAL) 
Principal Investigator: James Marcin, M.D., MPH
Co-Investigators: Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., MPH, FAAP, FACEP; and Julia Magana, M.D.
Collaborating Agencies: North Coast Emergency Medical Services Agency and Sierra-Sacramento Valley Emergency Medical Services Agency
Funding Agency: Health Resources and Services Administration, Emergency Medical Services for Children, State Partnership Regionalization of Care
Award: $797,171
Period: June 1, 2016 to May 31, 2020
TACTICAL aims to expand pediatric quality improvement, telehealth and a standardized data collection program to rural and underserved California communities. The goal is to ensure that evidence-based emergency medical services are delivered to children in both the pre-hospital setting as well as at receiving emergency departments, and that ongoing education and quality care are provided. In addition, the program implements a standardized facility recognition program for pediatric emergency care and establishes a data collection and monitoring system.

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A Randomized Trial of Tele-Emergency Care for Seriously Ill Children
Principal Investigators: James Marcin, M.D., MPH
Co-Investigators: Nathan Kuppermann, M.D., MPH
Funding Agencies: Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, Office for the Advancement of Telehealth
Award: $1,597,442
Period: September 1, 2014 to August 31, 2019
The goal of this research project is to determine the impact of an existing tele-emergency care network on quality of care, appropriateness of care utilization, patient safety (medication errors), and cost effectiveness compared to telephone consultations from the perspective of a health care system. The study will focus on pediatric patients at more than 15 rural and underserved hospitals sprinkled throughout California. Researchers aim to demonstrate how an existing tele-emergency network can benefit rural and other community hospitals as well as the children they serve.

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