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UC Davis Health System

UC Davis Health System

Stress in the lives of mothers of adolescents and adults with autism

Next MIND Institute Distinguished Lecture to be held Feb. 10

Posted Feb. 3, 2010

Marsha Mallick Seltzer © University of Wisconsin-MadisonMarsha Mallick Seltzer, a leading expert on the effects of caregiving on the family, will discuss the stresses of mothering an adolescent or adult with an autism spectrum disorder during the Feb. 10 UC Davis MIND Institute Distinguished Lecture. The lecture will take place at 4:30 p.m. in the MIND Institute Auditorium at 2825 50th St. in Sacramento.

Seltzer is the Vaughan Bascom Professor and director of the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on the life course impacts of disability on the family. She investigates how lifelong caregiving affects the well-being of parents and siblings of individuals with disabilities, including autism, fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome and schizophrenia. In addition, she has studied how the family environment affects the development of individuals with disabilities.

Although autism often is thought of as a childhood disorder, the condition is lifelong. Seltzer’s research characterizes how the behaviors of people with autism change in adolescence and adulthood and examines the long-term impacts of these changes on the family. Her presentation will review her research findings, highlight the critical role of the family in fostering positive behavioral outcomes and examine the long-term impact on the physiology and health of mothers of adolescents and adults with autism.

UC Davis MIND Institute © UC Regents
UC Davis MIND Institute

Seltzer also is the chair of the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Centers Association, chair of the Gatlinburg Conference on Theory and Research on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the author of over 150 publications. She is the recipient of the Distinguished Research Award of The Arc and the Christian Pueschel Memorial Research Award of the Down Syndrome Congress.

All Distinguished Lecturer Series presentations are open to the public, with no reservations required. The MIND Institute Resource Center is open one hour before and 30 minutes after each presentation. All Distinguished Lecturer Series presentations are viewable on the MIND Institute Web site.

The UC Davis MIND Institute in Sacramento, Calif., was founded in 1998 as a unique interdisciplinary research center where parents, community leaders, researchers, clinicians and volunteers collaborate to study and treat autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. More information about the institute is available on the Web at http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/.