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UC Davis Health System

UC Davis Health System

Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing awarded faculty fellowships for geriatric curriculum development

Photo of nurse with elderly patient By 2050, 21 million Americans are expected to be aged 85 and over, with those in the 100-year-old and older category to increase by more than tenfold, from 72,000 in 2000 to 834,000.

The New York-based John A. Hartford Foundation, a national leader in the funding of educational programs and policy development in geriatric nursing, has committed two training fellowships to future faculty appointees of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis.

The fellowships will allow faculty responsible for developing the baccalaureate-nursing curriculum at UC Davis to participate in training offered through the Geriatric Nursing Education Consortium. This national initiative from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the Hartford Institute for Geriatric Nursing aims to educate 700 faculty at baccalaureate schools of nursing across the country on the fundamentals of geriatric nursing and undergraduate curriculum development. The faculty-development program is supported with a $2.4 million grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation.

"These training fellowships are an important addition to our new school of nursing as we recruit founding faculty and develop our curriculum," said Ann Bonham, executive associate dean for research and education at UC Davis School of Medicine and transition team leader for the proposed Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. "Incorporating the latest information in geriatric nursing and fostering research in this critical field of nursing science is essential to meet the growing health-care needs of our nation."

Photo of Dr. Bonham"Incorporating the latest information in geriatric nursing and fostering research in this critical field of nursing science is essential to meet the growing health-care needs of our nation."
— Ann Bonham, executive associate dean for research and education

By 2030, the number of Americans over the age of 65 is expected to double — from 35 million estimated by the 2000 U.S. Census to 70 million. By 2050, 21 million Americans are expected to be aged 85 and over, with those in the 100-year-old and older category to increase by more than tenfold, from 72,000 in 2000 to 834,000.

"The aging of the American population will certainly have an impact on our health-care system and the delivery of services," said Corinne Rieder, executive director of the Hartford Foundation. "Our nursing work force must be prepared to offer a full complement of services that will enable seniors to function as independently as possible and to lead productive lives. The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, with its focus on training future leaders, can have a profound impact on successfully managing the upcoming shift in patient demographics and service needs. We are excited to have the opportunity to support this work at the development stage of a new school."

In addition to developing a strong undergraduate curriculum in geriatrics, the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing plans to incorporate advanced gerontology principles and leadership development in geriatric nursing at the graduate level.

"Our interprofessional, team-based approach to education will help us train future nursing leaders who not only understand the health-care delivery needs of older adults but who also can work well with a variety of health-care professionals as part of the provider and leadership team," said Bonham. "The knowledge and resources of the John A. Hartford Foundation initiative will assist us in creating a leading-edge curriculum to achieve these goals."