Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

Symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome associated with interference in ...
Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

NEWS | June 25, 2013

Symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome associated with interference in circadian, metabolic genes

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

Researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute and Agilent Laboratories have found that Prader-Willi syndrome — a genetic disorder best known for causing an insatiable appetite that can lead to morbid obesity — is associated with the loss of non-coding RNAs, resulting in the dysregulation of circadian and metabolic genes, accelerated energy expenditure and metabolic differences during sleep.

Janine LaSalle Janine LaSalle

The research was led by Janine LaSalle, a professor in the UC Davis Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology who is affiliated with the MIND Institute. It is published online in Human Molecular Genetics.

“Prader-Willi syndrome children do not sleep as well at night and have daytime sleepiness,” LaSalle said. “Parents have to lock up their pantries because the kids are rummaging for food in the middle of the night, even breaking into their neighbors' houses to eat.”

The study found that these behaviors are rooted in the loss of a long non-coding RNA that functions to balance energy expenditure in the brain during sleep. The finding could have a profound effect on how clinicians treat children with Prader-Willi, as well as point the way to new, innovative therapies, LaSalle said.

The leading cause of morbid obesity among children in the United States, Prader-Willi involves a complex, and sometimes contradictory, array of symptoms. Shortly after birth children with Prader-Willi experience failure to thrive. Yet after they begin to feed themselves, they have difficulty sleeping and insatiable appetites that lead to obesity if their diets are not carefully monitored.

The current study was conducted in a mouse model of Prader-Willi syndrome. It found that mice engineered with the loss of a long non-coding RNA showed altered energy use and metabolic differences during sleep.

Prader-Willi has been traced to a specific region on chromosome 15 (SNORD116), which produces RNAs that regulate gene expression, rather than coding for proteins. When functioning normally, SNORD116 produces small nucleolar (sno) RNAs and a long non-coding RNA (116HG), as well as a third non-coding RNA implicated in a related disorder, Angelman syndrome. The 116HG long non-coding RNA forms a cloud inside neuronal nuclei that associates with proteins and genes regulating diurnal metabolism in the brain, LaSalle said.

“We thought the cloud would be activating transcription, but in fact it was doing the opposite,” she said. “Most of the genes were dampened by the cloud. This long non-coding RNA was acting as a decoy, pulling the active transcription factors away from genes and keeping them from being expressed.”

As a result, losing snoRNAs and 116HG causes a chain reaction, eliminating the RNA cloud and allowing circadian and metabolic genes to get turned on during sleep periods, when they should be dampened down. This underlies a complex cycle in which the RNA cloud grew during sleep periods (daytime for nocturnal mice), turning down genes associated with energy use, and receded during waking periods, allowing these genes to be expressed. Mice without the 116HG gene lacked the benefit of this neuronal cloud, causing greater energy expenditure during sleep.

The researchers said that the work provides a clearer picture of why children with Prader-Willi syndrome can’t sleep or feel satiated and may change therapeutic approaches. For example, many such children have been treated with growth hormone because of short stature, but this actually may boost other aspects of the disease.

“People had thought the kids weren’t sleeping at night because of the sleep apnea caused by obesity,” said LaSalle. “What this study shows is that the diurnal metabolism is central to the disorder, and that the obesity may be as a result of that. If you can work with that, you could improve therapies, for example figuring out the best times to administer medications.”

The study's other study authors include Weston T. Powell, Rochelle L. Coulson, Florence K. Crary, Spencer S. Wong, Robert A. Ach and Dag H. Yasui, all of UC Davis, and Peter Tsang and N. Alice Yamada of Agilent Laboratories.

The work was funded by National Institutes of Health grants F31NS073164 and 1R01NS076263 and the Prader-Willi Foundation.

At the UC Davis MIND Institute, world-renowned scientists engage in collaborative, interdisciplinary research to find the causes of and develop treatments and cures for autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fragile X syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. For more information, visit mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.