Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

Abbeduto receives grant to study language acquisition in ...
Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.

NEWS | March 26, 2013

Abbeduto receives grant to study language acquisition in fragile X syndrome and Down syndrome

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

A team of researchers led by UC Davis MIND Institute Director Leonard Abbeduto will investigate the effectiveness of testing procedures to examine the spoken language development of people with fragile X syndrome and people with Down syndrome, through a new five-year, $3 million grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health.

Leonard Abbeduto Leonard Abbeduto

The grant will be used to determine whether these procedures can be utilized to gauge the efficacy of new drugs under development for treating the cognitive and behavioral challenges that face individuals with intellectual disabilities, including fragile X syndrome and Down syndrome.

“Language improvement is an important target for many of these promising new drugs," Abbeduto said. "However, we don’t yet have tools sensitive and accurate enough to measure change in language in clinical trials. This study may lead us to understand the efficacy of these drugs.”

Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and ranges in severity from learning disabilities to more severe cognitive impairment. It is the most common single-gene cause of intellectual disability and of autism spectrum disorder. Down syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is a chromosomal condition caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21. It is the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability. Down syndrome is accompanied by distinctive facial characteristics and also can be accompanied by other medical conditions, including congenital heart defects.

The research conducted in Abbeduto’s lab has focused, in part, on identifying the specific profiles of language development that characterize fragile X syndrome and Down syndrome, including the aspects of language that are similar or differ between these two disorders.

For the current study, Abbeduto will collaborate with researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, the University of Wisconsin, Madison and the University of Arizona, Tucson. The study will evaluate the reliability and sensitivity of a language-evaluation procedure that Abbeduto has pioneered for two decades called expressive-language sampling.

Expressive-language sampling involves collecting actual samples of spoken language from individuals in different highly scripted and structural contexts and at different times and comparing them with one another to evaluate growth and change in language usage. In the funded project, results of expressive-language sampling will be compared to results obtained from standardized tests of language development to examine the relationship between the skills measured with each respective measure.

Advances in molecular genetics have identified more than 1,000 genetic causes of intellectual disability. This research has led to disease-specific treatments with several pharmaceuticals under development to address the symptoms of different syndromes that result in intellectual disability. However, the advances are hampered by a lack of validated outcome measures against which response-to-treatment can be evaluated for individuals with these developmental disabilities. Expressive-language sampling techniques, while widely used for clinical and behavioral research purposes, have not yet been validated for use as outcome measures for studies of drug treatment efficacy. The newly funded study will address this issue by examining the short-term consistency and long-term sensitivity and the validity of expressive-language sampling procedures.

To conduct the study, the researchers will enroll a total of 300 participants, 150 with fragile X syndrome and 150 with Down syndrome. Each site will recruit and test a total of 60 participants over the course of the five-year project. Three age groups will be recruited for testing: 6 to 11; 12 to 17; and 18 to 23 years. 

Each of the study participants will be tested using both standardized tests and with the expressive-language sampling procedures. The language-sampling procedure consists of obtaining samples of spoken language in two different contexts. One is narrating a story depicted in a wordless picture book; the second is performance during a scripted 10-minute conversation with an examiner. The participants will be tested at three different times: an initial testing session, one held two weeks later and a follow-up test after two years.

The study’s hypothesis is that, for individuals with intellectual disabilities, standardized tests do not offer the nuanced information necessary to gauge whether language is improving over time, because standardized tests are de-contextualized rather than naturalistic and because they have a “floor effect:” Individuals with intellectual disabilities often receive very low scores on standardized tests, limiting the utility of such tests to provide specific information on how the individual uses language in every day life.

Expressive-language sampling, on the other hand, can provide detailed information on the vocabulary an individual uses and the complexity of the sentences they are able to produce and even the intelligibility of their speech. This kind of information is necessary to judge the effectiveness of drug-treatment protocols as well as to guide planning for behavioral interventions.

“The preliminary data suggests that our procedures can measure even subtle but important changes in language, and pharmaceutical companies see the potential utility of these procedures,” Abbeduto said.

At the UC Davis MIND Institute, world-renowned scientists engage in collaborative, interdisciplinary research to find the causes of and develop treatments and cures for autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fragile X syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. For more information, visit mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
UC Davis Pediatric Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn. We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.