Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
  • UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building (see map) on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn.

We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

View all clinic locations with maps and directions »

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.



Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
  • UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building (see map) on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn.

We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

View all clinic locations with maps and directions »

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.



Minocycline, an antibiotic, improves behavior for children with ...
Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
  • UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building (see map) on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn.

We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

View all clinic locations with maps and directions »

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.



Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
  • UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building (see map) on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn.

We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

View all clinic locations with maps and directions »

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.



NEWS | April 8, 2013

Minocycline, an antibiotic, improves behavior for children with fragile X syndrome

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

Minocycline, an older, broad-spectrum antibiotic in the tetracycline family, provides meaningful improvements as a therapeutic for children with fragile X syndrome, a study by researchers at the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The finding is important, the researchers said, because minocycline is readily available by prescription.

Mary Jacena Leigh Mary Jacena Leigh

After three months of treatment with minocycline, children with fragile X syndrome had greater improvements in general behavior, anxiety and mood-related behaviors, when compared with children with fragile X syndrome who received placebo rather than the medication. The study was led by Mary Jacena Leigh, associate clinical professor of behavioral and developmental pediatrics with the Fragile X Research and Treatment Center at the MIND Institute.

“This study provides evidence of the efficacy of this medication as a targeted treatment for fragile X syndrome with a long history of use and that can currently be prescribed,” Leigh said. “Further studies examining the long-term benefits and side effects are needed, perhaps in combination with other educational and medication treatments being developed for individuals with the condition.”

The research is published online today in the Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, the journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual impairment, formerly termed mental retardation, and is the leading known single-gene cause of autism spectrum disorder. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that about 1 in 4,000 males and females have the disorder. The condition is caused by a mutation in a single gene, FMR1, found on the X chromosome.

For the current study, 66 children with fragile X syndrome were randomly assigned to three months of treatment with minocycline or an inactive placebo. After three months, the study participants were switched to the other treatment. Parents and doctors did not know which treatment the child received until completion of the study.

Fifty-five patients completed the study. The children had small but significant improvements in certain areas during treatment with minocycline, compared to placebo. In particular, they scored better on the Clinical Global Impression Scale, on which doctors and parents rated their overall impression of the patients' status. 

Children taking minocycline also had greater improvement in anxiety and mood-related behaviors, as rated by parents. Other outcomes were not significantly better with minocycline, including behavior problems and verbal functioning.

Side effects were generally similar between groups, with no serious adverse effects. Minocycline may cause some discoloration of the teeth — a known side effect of minocycline and related antibiotics — which was seen in both treatment arms.

“Some children responded very well to minocycline; others did not, so we now are studying biomarkers that can help us determine who will be a responder," said Randi Hagerman, MIND Institute medical director and the study's senior author.

Minocycline is an older antibiotic and most commonly is used for treatment of severe acne. Studies in animal models and initial studies in humans have suggested that it might have beneficial effects in the treatment of fragile X. It also has been studied as a potential neuroprotective treatment for other conditions, such as multiple sclerosis.

Other treatments for the condition now under investigation include a class of drugs called mGluR5 agonists and GABA agonists, such as ganaxolone or arbaclofen, which also are studied at the MIND Institute. However, minocycline is the only targeted fragile X treatment currently available by prescription. Because of its long history of use, the side effects and safety characteristics of minocycline are well known.

Other study authors include Danh V. Nguyen, Yi Mu, Andrea Schneider, Tasleem Checki, Jonathan Polussa, Paul Doucet, Flora Tassone, Susan M. Rivera, David Hessl, and Randi J. Hagerman, all of UC Davis and Tri Indah Winarni of Diponegoro University, Indonesia.

The study was funded by the National Fragile X Foundation, grant UL1 TR000002 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (Nguyen), Interdisciplinary Training for Autism Researchers 5T32MH073124 (Leigh), A Toolbox of Outcome Measures for Targeted Treatment Trials in Children 3UL1 RR024146-04S4, and the Fragile X Research Center Grant HD02274.

At the UC Davis MIND Institute, world-renowned scientists engage in collaborative, interdisciplinary research to find the causes of and develop treatments and cures for autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fragile X syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. For more information, visit mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Pediatric Heart Center | UC Davis Children's Hospital
  • UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center

The UC Davis Pediatric Heart Center is inland Northern California's only full-service pediatric heart center, offering the latest tests and treatments for a range of congenital heart conditions. Our integrated multidisciplinary team of surgeons, specialists, physicians, nurses and researchers provide some of Northern California's most sophisticated specialty and surgical expertise in:

  • Pediatric cardiology
  • Pediatric cardiothoracic surgery
  • Cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology
  • Neonatal and pediatric intensive care
  • Pediatric critical care nursing
  • Fetal diagnosis of heart defects

Our pediatric heart specialists treat patients both in Sacramento and throughout Northern California at our outreach clinics, which allow children in outlying areas to receive a consultation and evaluation without having to travel to Sacramento.

To schedule an appointment at any of our clinic locations, please call 916-734-3456.

The Pediatric Heart Center sees patients in the Sacramento area at the Glassrock Building (see map) on the campus of the UC Davis Medical Center and at the UC Davis Medical Group clinics in Roseville and Auburn.

We also schedule and hold monthly outreach clinics in Redding, Chico, Stockton, and Marysville. To schedule an appointment at any of our clinics, please call 916-734-3456.

View all clinic locations with maps and directions »

Surgical intervention for infants diagnosed with congenital heart disease addresses a variety of defects, including:

Some conditions may be treated using catheters - thin, flexible, narrow tubes threaded through blood vessels to the heart - rather than traditional, invasive cardiothoracic surgery. Cardiac catheterization can be used to make repairs, like closing holes in the heart muscle or removing obstructions from the blood vessels, or to place stents in narrowed or blocked blood vessels to keep them open.

Pediatric cardiac electrophysiology uses radiofrequency catheter ablation to treat cardiac arrhythmias, disrupting areas of the heart that are the source of the electrical irregularities.

Patient story, cardiothoracic surgery

Gary Raff, pediatric heart surgeon talks about what we do at UC Davis in the cardiac operating room. Patient story of Elijah Rangel who underwent surgery for congenital heart disease.

Pediatric heart patients recover in UC Davis' state-of-the-art Pediatric Intensive Care Unit/Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PICU/PCICU). The unit has a 2-to-1 patient-to-nurse ratio, and critical care medicine physicians are on site 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Larger, single-patient rooms enhance family-centered care - a sleeping sofa and a chair in each room enable family members to remain at their child's bedside around the clock. Each room has its own bathroom.

Children who are well enough have access to an activity room with music, art and play therapy provided by the hospital's Child Life and Creative Arts Therapy Department. The program helps relieve the stress and anxiety of hospitalization.

The Pediatric Heart Center is part of the National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative, a group of 58 medical institutions that collaborates on quality improvement tools and methods to improve the health outcomes of care for children with cardiovascular disease and enhance communication between clinicians and parents. More information about the NPCQI's programs and outcomes is available from their website.