NEWS | April 14, 2015

UC Davis nursing graduate students earn top awards at interdisciplinary symposium

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

Three master’s-degree students in the Nursing Science and Health-Care Leadership Master of Science — Leadership Graduate Degree Program at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis took home top awards at the 2015 UC Davis Interdisciplinary Graduate and Professional Student Symposium.

The annual event, presented by the UC Davis Office of Graduate Studies, is an opportunity for graduate and professional students from all disciplines to share their current work with each other, the campus, and the wider community.

Jerry John Nutor, a nurse, won both the $1,000 Dean's Prize for Best Oral Presentation in Nursing for his poster presentation, "Household Resources as Determinants of Child Mortality in Ghana" and the $1,500 Provost's Prize for Best Student Organized Session as part of a panel discussion on interdisciplinary research and practice.

School of Nursing master’s degree students Charlie Dharmasukrit and Laura Courson
School of Nursing master’s degree students Charlie Dharmasukrit and Laura Courson won Vice Chancellor's Prize for Best Poster at the 2015 UC Davis Interdisciplinary Graduate and Professional Student Symposium.

“The dean's award inspires me to continue to advocate for children and their mothers who are living in poverty in Ghana and sub-Saharan Africa,” said Nutor, who is from Ghana. “I hope to use interdisciplinary research and practice as a wake-up call to all professionals, whether in nursing, medicine, engineering, education or business, to come together to find solutions to our complex problems and make the world a better place to live.”

Laura Corson and Charlie Dharmasukrit presented a joint poster that earned the Vice Chancellor's Prize for Best Poster and $1,000. The poster, "Student Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Efficacy, Readiness, and Perceived Clinical Judgment Through the Use of Multi-patient Simulation: A Pilot Study," detailed their study which aims to increase student awareness to safely and effectively prioritize, delegate and implement care for multiple people in a clinical setting.

“This accomplishment was an honor because it made me realize that the greater academic community realizes the importance of not only our project, but also for the importance of further nursing research to ensure quality patient care for future generations,” said Dharmasukrit, who will graduate from the master’s-degree program in June and begin his doctoral studies at the School of Nursing this fall.

“Our pilot study illustrated how our research using this simulation technique in nursing education can contribute to improving the confidence of nursing students and help increase their readiness to care for multiple patients upon graduation,” Courson added.

About the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis transforms health care through nursing education and research. Established in 2009 through a $100 million grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the school offers four graduate areas of study, including doctoral and master’s-degree programs in nursing science and health-care leadership and master’s-degree programs for nurse practitioners and physician assistants, with a focus on preparing primary-care providers for rural and underserved communities. The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing is part of UC Davis Health System, an integrated, academic health system encompassing the UC Davis School of Medicine, UC Davis Medical Center and the UC Davis Medical Group. For more information, visit http://nursing.ucdavis.edu.