NEWS | January 21, 2015

Project ADAM's first California affiliate established at UC Davis Children's Hospital

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

A life-saving program that helps to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in children and teens has now arrived in California.

Stuart Berger Stuart Berger

UC Davis Children’s Hospital in Sacramento has become the first California affiliate for Project ADAM (Automated Defibrillators in Adam’s Memory), a non-profit organization dedicated to establishing comprehensive defibrillation programs in schools across the country. The program’s mission is to reach out to schools to ensure that automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are installed and that staff, faculty, students and families are trained how to use them and to perform CPR. 

Stuart Berger, chief of the Division of Pediatric Cardiology at UC Davis Children’s Hospital, founded Project ADAM while he was working at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in 1999. The program has since expanded to 10 states in its 15 years of operation and more than 85 lives have been saved in children and adolescents as well as adults.

“I’m very excited to bring Project ADAM to the Sacramento region,” said Berger. "This has been such a wonderful community outreach project. It has brought the community together at multiple levels and it has saved livesIt would be wonderful to institute this program in every school in the state of California as well as in the entire country."

Photo of logo

The Sacramento Kings will host a night dedicated to heart health awareness on Feb. 20. A portion of proceeds from tickets purchased through this ticket link (using passcode: Kings) will be donated to the Sacramento Project ADAM.

Project ADAM was named in honor of 17-year-old Wisconsin high school basketball player, Adam Lemel, who died on the court due to an undiagnosed genetic heart condition. According to Berger, at least 100 to 200 children and teens experience sudden non-traumatic cardiac death each year in the U.S., although the exact number is unclear and this number could be an underestimate of the true incidence. Multiple studies, including the new National Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Sudden Death in the Young registry, have been designed to get more specific data about the incidence of this devastating problem.

Schools, organizations and community members interested in being a part of Project ADAM Sacramento are welcome to attend the next community meeting on Thursday, Jan. 29 at 5:30 p.m. at the UC Davis Health System Facilities Support Services Building, 4800 2nd Ave., Sacramento in room 2030.

For more information, please contact Amber Lindgren, administrator for Project ADAM Sacramento, at 916-734-2460 or amlindgren@ucdavis.edu.

UC Davis Children's Hospital is the Sacramento region's only nationally ranked, comprehensive hospital for children, serving infants, children, adolescents and young adults with primary, subspecialty and critical care. It includes the Central Valley's only pediatric emergency department and Level I pediatric trauma center, which offers the highest level of care for critically ill children. The 129-bed children's hospital includes the state-of-the-art 49-bed neonatal and 24-bed pediatric intensive care and pediatric cardiac intensive care units. With more than 120 physicians in 33 subspecialties, UC Davis Children's Hospital has more than 74,000 clinic and hospital visits and 13,000 emergency department visits each year. For more information, visit children.ucdavis.edu.