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News from UC Davis Health System

News from UC Davis Health System

NEWS | February 2, 2012

UC Davis experts to host discussion on chronic pain and the promise of stem cell therapies

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

Experts from UC Davis Health System will share the latest research about regenerative medicine, with a focus on chronic pain and the promise of stem cell therapies, during a community forum on the university's Sacramento campus. The discussion takes place on Tuesday, Feb. 7, from 6- 7:30 p.m. at the UC Davis Education Building, 4610 X Street, in Sacramento.

The event features Jan Nolta, director of the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures; Scott Fishman, chief of the UC Davis Division of Pain Medicine; and Kee Kim, co-director of the UC Davis Spine Center. The three specialists will discuss the challenges of treating chronic pain, especially back and neck pain, and the clinical research now under way to use stem cell therapies to overcome it.

The forum is free and open to the public. It is part of "Stem Cell Dialogues," UC Davis Health System's discussion series about regenerative medicine and the goal of turning stem cells into cures. Each speaker will provide a short presentation followed by a panel discussion and question and answer period. The event will be moderated by Fred Meyers, professor of medicine and pathology, and executive associate dean of UC Davis School of Medicine.

Seating is limited. Those interested in attending must reserve a seat by contacting Kate Rodrigues at 916-734-9404 or kathleen.rodrigues@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu. Doors open at 5:30 p.m.  Free parking will be available in Lots 12 and 14, just south of the Education Building, near 45th Street and 2nd Avenue.

UC Davis is playing a leading role in regenerative medicine, with nearly 150 scientists working on a variety of stem cell-related research projects at campus locations in both Davis and Sacramento. The UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures, a facility supported by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), opened in 2010 on the Sacramento campus. This $62 million facility is the university's hub for stem cell science. It includes Northern California's largest academic Good Manufacturing Practice laboratory, with state-of-the-art equipment and manufacturing rooms for cellular and gene therapies. UC Davis also has a Translational Human Embryonic Stem Cell Shared Research Facility in Davis and a collaborative partnership with the Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine at Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California. All of the programs and facilities complement the university's Clinical and Translational Science Center, and focus on turning stem cells into cures. For more information, visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/stemcellresearch.