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UC Davis MIND Institute

UC Davis MIND Institute

NEWS | May 22, 2014

MIND Institute celebrates its volunteers

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

The MIND Institute celebrated its more than 150 volunteers with a reception on Friday, May 16. At the institute, volunteers play crucial roles throughout the organization, from assisting families and children in the clinics to supporting research.  

MIND Institute volunteer Mary Kimball receives a hug from Child Life Specialist and Volunteer Coordinator Erin Roseborough. MIND Institute volunteer Mary Kimball receives a hug from Child Life Specialist and Volunteer Coordinator Erin Roseborough.

“The MIND Institute wouldn’t be able to serve its communities as well as it does without the help and services of more than 150 volunteers, some of whom have been with us as long as nine years,” said MIND Institute Director Leonard Abbeduto. “Our communities include the children and families who come to the MIND Institute for services, as well as the staff and faculty who practice here,” he said.

“I couldn’t do my job without our volunteers,” said Erin Roseborough, MIND Institute child life specialist and volunteer coordinator. “Volunteers are a key part of our team, providing assistance by watching children during research and diagnostic appointments.They take children outside or play with them in the waiting areas so that parents and clinicians can make the most of their time together."

Four volunteers stood out at the celebration: Elfrieda DeLany, Mary Kimball and Yara Judal all have volunteered with the MIND Institute for nine years and Ed McConnell has been a volunteer for eight.

“On behalf of all of the MIND Institute's faculty, staff and families, I want to express our heartfelt appreciation and gratitude,” Abbeduto said. “Without all of you, we couldn’t do what we do each and every day.”

The UC Davis MIND Institute in Sacramento, Calif., was founded in 1998 as a unique interdisciplinary research center where families, community leaders, researchers, clinicians and volunteers work together toward a common goal: researching causes, treatments and eventual preventions and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders. The institute has major research efforts in autism, fragile X syndrome, chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Down syndrome. More information about the institute and its Distinguished Lecturer Series, including previous presentations in this series, is available on the Web at mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu.