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UC Davis Medical Center

UC Davis Medical Center

NEWS | September 13, 2013

Wintemute to receive distinguished career award for injury prevention efforts

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

Garen Wintmute, one of the nation’s foremost scholars addressing violence as a public-health problem, has been selected to receive the 2013 Distinguished Career Award from the Injury Control and Emergency Health Services Section of the American Public Health Association. He will receive the award at the association’s annual meeting in Boston in November.

Garen Wintemute is a professor of emergency medicine and holds the Susan P. Baker-Stephen P.Teret Chair in Violence Prevention. Garen Wintemute is a professor of emergency medicine and holds the Susan P. Baker-Stephen P.Teret Chair in Violence Prevention.

Wintemute is a national expert on firearm violence and public policies and attitudes related to firearms. His longstanding commitment to understand the nature of firearm violence and its underlying causes has produced a uniquely rich and informative body of research on firearm violence that directly improves the health and safety of Americans and that has positioned California — and UC Davis — as national leaders in efforts to break the cycle of gun violence.

For more than 20 years, Wintemute's work has increased awareness of gun violence as a public-health problem, fueling change in the industry and innovative legislation to prevent easy access to guns used in crime.

Wintemute is a professor of emergency medicine and holds the Susan P. Baker-Stephen P.Teret Chair in Violence Prevention. He earned his medical degree in 1977 from UC Davis School of Medicine, where he also completed his residency in family medicine. In 1981, he was medical coordinator at Nong Samet Refugee Camp in Cambodia, a remote area that had only recently been liberated from the governance of Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge. He later returned stateside to merge his medical training with public policy, and earned a master’s degree in public health at Johns Hopkins in 1983.

As Violence Prevention Research Program director, he works to maximize the impact of current studies, advance research on multiple fronts and develop a program that will train the next generation of researchers in the field.

UC Davis Health System is improving lives and transforming health care by providing excellent patient care, conducting groundbreaking research, fostering innovative, interprofessional education, and creating dynamic, productive partnerships with the community. The academic health system includes one of the country's best medical schools, a 619-bed acute-care teaching hospital, a 1,000-member physician's practice group and the new Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing. It is home to a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center, an international neurodevelopmental institute, a stem cell institute and a comprehensive children's hospital. Other nationally prominent centers focus on advancing telemedicine, improving vascular care, eliminating health disparities and translating research findings into new treatments for patients. Together, they make UC Davis a hub of innovation that is transforming health for all. For more information, visit healthsystem.ucdavis.edu.