Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



'Support cells' in brain play important role in ...
Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



NEWS | July 18, 2014

'Support cells' in brain play important role in Down syndrome

New research also suggests common antibiotic might help treat the genetic defect

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children – Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. After developing a new model for studying the syndrome using patient-derived stem cells, the scientists also found that applying an inexpensive antibiotic to the cells appears to correct many abnormalities in the interaction between the cells and developing neurons.

Pictured (L - R) David Pleasure, Chen Chen, Wenbin Deng and Peng Jiang Pictured (L - R) David Pleasure, Chen Chen, Wenbin Deng and Peng Jiang

The findings, which focused on support cells in the brain called astroglial cells, appear online today in Nature Communications.

“We have developed a human cellular model for studying brain development in Down syndrome that allows us to carry out detailed physiological studies and screen possible new therapies,” said Wenbin Deng, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular medicine and principal investigator of the study. “This model is more realistic than traditional animal models because it is derived from a patient’s own cells.”

Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal cause of mild to moderate intellectual disabilities in the United States, where it occurs in one in every 691 live births. It develops when a person has three copies of the 21st chromosome instead of the normal two. While mouse models have traditionally been used in studying the genetic disorder, Deng said the animal model is inadequate because the human brain is more complicated, and much of that complexity arises from astroglia cells, the star-shaped cells that play an important role in the physical structure of the brain as well as in the transmission of nerve impulses.

“Although neurons are regarded as our ‘thinking cells,’ the astroglia have an extremely important supportive role,” said Deng. “Astroglial function is increasingly recognized as a critical factor in neuronal dysfunction in the brain, and this is the first study to show its importance in Down syndrome.”

Creating a unique human cellular model

To investigate the role of astroglia in Down syndrome, the research team took skin cells from individuals with Down syndrome and transformed them into stem cells, which are known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). The cells possess the same genetic make-up as the donor and an ability to grow into different cell types. Deng and his colleagues next induced the stem cells to develop into separate pure populations of astroglial cells and neurons. This allowed them to systematically analyze factors expressed by the astroglia and then study their effects on neuron development.

They found that a certain protein, known as S100B, is markedly increased in astroglial cells from patients with Down syndrome compared with those from healthy controls. S100B released by astroglial cells promotes harmful astroglial activation (astrogliosis) and adversely affects neurons, causing them to die at increased rates or develop in multiple dysfunctional ways.

The investigators obtained further evidence of the critical role of astroglial cells in Down syndrome by implanting the skin-cell derived astroglial cells from Down syndrome patients into mice. Those mice then developed the neuropathological phenotypes of Down syndrome, while mice implanted with Down syndrome neurons did not.

Neuroprotective effects of antibiotics

The research team also screened candidate drugs using a ‘disease-in-a-dish’ model. When they administered minocycline — a tetracycline antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties commonly used to treat bacterial infections, acne and arthritis — many of the abnormalities in the astroglial cells were corrected and there were more healthy interactions between the astroglia and neurons compared to the control cells without the defect.

“The advent of induced pluripotent stem cell technology has created exciting new approaches to model neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases for the study of pathogenesis and for drug screening,” said David Pleasure, professor of neurology and pediatrics and a co-author of the study. “Using this technology, the study is the first to discover the critical role of astroglial cells in Down syndrome as well as identify a promising pathway for exploring how a drug such as minocycline may offer an effective way to help treat it.”

Pleasure, who is research director at Shriner’s Hospital for Children Northern California and also directs the Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, noted that considerable research interest has arisen about the use of minocycline for diseases of the central nervous system because of the increasing evidence about its neuroprotective effects. Unlike many drugs, minocycline can cross from the bloodstream into the brain so that it can act on the astroglial cells. The drug has never been tested as a treatment for Down syndrome, and both Pleasure and Deng cautioned that its safety and efficacy will require clinical trials in people with Down syndrome.

Currently, Deng’s laboratory is conducting additional preclinical studies using the human-derived stem cells from Down syndrome patients and mouse models to determine whether cellular and behavioral abnormalities can be improved with minocycline therapy and other candidate drugs.

“The abnormalities we identified occur in the early stages of Down syndrome,” said Deng. “While much more research is needed, it is exciting to consider that pharmacological intervention in these cellular processes might help slow or even prevent disease progression.”

Co-lead authors of the article, titled “Role of astroglia in Down’s syndrome revealed by patient-derived human-induced pluripotent stem cells,” were Chen Chen and Peng Jiang, both of the UC Davis Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine and the Institute for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine (a collaboration between UC Davis and Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California); Deng and Ying Liu of the Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center co-directed the study. Other authors were Suzanne Peterson, Ha Tran, Anna McCann, Louise Laurent and Jeanne Loring of the Center for Regenerative Medicine at The Scripps Research Institute; Mana Parast of UC San Diego; and Haipeng Xue and Shenlan Li of the Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center.

The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01NS061983, R01ES015988, R21 MH087925), the National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Career Development Award (K12 HD001259), the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Shriners Hospitals for Children, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (RT1-011071, RT1-01108, TR1-01250, CL1-00502), the Memorial Hermann Foundation (Staman Ogilvie Fund), the Bentsen Stroke Center, the Esther O’Keeffe Foundation, and the Hartwell Foundation.

The UC Davis School of Medicine is among the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. The school offers fully accredited master's degree programs in public health and in informatics, and its combined M.D.-Ph.D. program is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care. Along with being a recognized leader in medical research, the school is committed to serving underserved communities and advancing rural health. For more information, visit UC Davis School of Medicine at medschool.ucdavis.edu.

Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information