Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



How a cancer drug unties knots in the ...
Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



NEWS | August 5, 2013

How a cancer drug unties knots in the chromosome that causes Angelman and Prader-Willi syndromes

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

UC Davis researchers have identified how and where in the genome a cancer chemotherapy agent acts on and ‘un-silences’ the epigenetically silenced gene that causes Angelman syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, seizures, motor impairments, and laughing and smiling.

R-loop  © UC Regents R-loop © UC Regents

The agent, Topotecan, is a topoisomerase inhibitor, part of a class of drugs that in earlier research has been found to un-silence the Angelman gene, suggesting that it might be therapeutic for the condition, which affects approximately 1 in 25,000, or approximately 150,000 people worldwide. But how it acts has not been known.

Topotecan is primarily used to treat metastatic cancers, including ovarian cancer, cervical cancer and small-cell lung cancer, by preventing cells from dividing and causing their death.

The research, published online today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), found that the drug stabilizes the formation of strands of RNA that create RNA-DNA hybrids called ‘R-loops,’ in the Ube3a region of the gene15q11-q13. The gene is implicated in other neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. About 1 percent of cases of autism are linked to duplications in 15q11-q13 or “Dup15q,” children that over-express Ube3a.

The research was conducted using molecular genetic approaches in neural cells from a genetically engineered mouse model and in cell lines containing inserted mouse and human genetic sequences.

“Now we have a molecular mechanism for a proposed drug for a disease, so we can understand how it works and begin to tweak it to develop therapies,” said lead study author Weston Powell, a third-year medical student in the Physician Scientist Training Program in the UC Davis School of Medicine.

Angelman syndrome is caused by the loss of a maternally inherited Ube3a gene at the 15q11-q13 locus, which is expressed in brain neurons. Loss of the same chromosomal region inherited from the male parent causes another neurodevelopmental condition, Prader-Willi syndrome, best known for its sufferers’ obsessive-compulsive behavior and insatiable appetites which, if left unchecked, can lead to morbid obesity.

DNA is like a twisted rope, Powell explained, which opens as the enzyme polymerase travels down one thread of the rope to produce an RNA copy of the DNA strand. Normally the RNA leaves the DNA, but sometimes the RNA instead sticks to one piece of DNA, and an ‘R-loop’ is formed. These hybridized DNA-RNA loops create tension, preventing the DNA from having the characteristic flexibility that allows it to form its spiral helix or twisted-rope shape. R-loops themselves are a relatively recent discovery, and researchers have just begun to understand how they function.

While the discovery of the effect of Topotecan is important, future investigations will determine how and whether the drug may have therapeutic applications for Angelman syndrome, the researchers said.  

Researchers LaSalle and Weston © UC Regents
Janine LaSalle, a basic science MIND Institute researcher, and Weston Powell, a third-year medical student who works with Dr. LaSalle in her lab.

“Topotecan also has an effect everywhere in the genome,” Powell said. “One of the things it does is prevent cells from dividing. That’s why it’s a cancer drug. But that’s also a problem if you want to treat children, because it kills dividing cells.”

Powell said that additional investigations are needed to determine whether the drug can be tweaked to eliminate the global effect and only treat the targeted region.

Senior study author Janine LaSalle, professor of microbiology and immunology and a researcher affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute, said that the study highlights the significance of epigenetics in understanding both rare and more common neurodevelopmental disorders.

“What determines whether you have Prader-Willi syndrome or Angelman syndrome is whether the maternal or paternal gene is missing,” LaSalle said. “These are the classic, textbook epigenetic disorders involving parental imprinting. It’s not just about the chromosomes, but it's where — or who — they come from. In our study, we show that R-loops forming on the active paternal chromosome within the Prader-Willi region regulate imprinting of the Angelman gene, Ube3a, on the maternal chromosome.

“Epigenetics is the layers that are put on top of the genetic code by the environment. In the case of the imprinted inheritance of these two diseases, it’s simply the environment of whether the chromosomes travel through the egg or the sperm. But environmental influences, such as diet and exposure to pollutants, also affect the epigenetic layers and are becoming increasingly important in more common disorders such as autism,” La Salle said.

LaSalle said that the finding also is important because the diseases are caused by defects in a common chromosomal locus for autism-spectrum disorders. Rearrangements in 15q are increasing, she said, in both non-human primates and people. Her lab has recently found an association between polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels and 15q rearrangements in human postmortem brain tissue. Future investigations will examine the role of current persistent organic pollutants, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), that may have a role in promoting chromosomal rearrangements and epigenetic alterations in this region.

Other study authors include Rochelle L. Coulson, Michael L. Gonzales, Florence K. Crary, Spencer. S. Wong, Sarrita Adams, Dag H. Yasui, and Frédéric Chédin, all of UC Davis, and Robert A. Ach, Peter Tsang and N. Alice Yamada of UC Davis and Agilent Technologies.

The research was funded by National Institute of Health (NIH) grant F31NS073164 to Weston Powell ; NIH grant 1R01NS076263 to Janine LaSalle; NIH grant 1R01GM094299 grant to Frédéric Chédin and funding from the Prader-Willi Foundation.

At the UC Davis MIND Institute, world-renowned scientists engage in collaborative, interdisciplinary research to find the causes of and develop treatments and cures for autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fragile X syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. For more information, visit mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information