Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



UC Davis MIND Institute researchers identify specific fetal ...
Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



NEWS | July 9, 2013

UC Davis MIND Institute researchers identify specific fetal antigens attacked by maternal antibodies

Researchers identify biomarker for autism in a subset of children: Maternal Antibody-Related autism

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

UC Davis MIND Institute researchers have identified the specific antibodies that target fetal brain proteins in the blood of a subset of women whose children are diagnosed with autism. The finding is the first to pinpoint a specific risk factor for a significant subset of autism cases, as well as a biomarker for drug development and early diagnosis. The researchers have named autism related to these antibodies “Maternal Autoantibody-Related," or MAR autism.  

The study found that the mothers of children with autism were more than 21 times as likely to have the specific MAR antibodies in their systems that reacted with fetal brain proteins, or antigens, than were the mothers of children who did not have autism. In fact, specific combinations of MAR antibodies were not found in the blood of mothers whose children were typically developing.

Video: Researcher Judy Van de Water discusses her findings.

The research, "Autism-specific maternal autoantibodies recognize critical proteins in developing brain," is published online today in Translational Psychiatry, a Nature journal.

The study was led by principal investigator and immunologist Judy Van de Water, a researcher affiliated with the MIND Institute. Earlier studies by Van de Water and her colleagues found that women with certain antibodies in their bloodstreams are at greater risk of having a child with autism and that their children exhibited more severe language delays, irritability and self-injurious behaviors than did the autistic children of mothers whose blood did not have the antibodies. 

“Now we will be able to better determine the role of each protein in brain development,” said Van de Water, professor of internal medicine. “We hope that, one day, we can tell a mother more precisely what her antibody profile means for her child, then target interventions more effectively.” 

To identify the exact antigens targeted by the mothers’ antibodies, Van de Water and her colleagues conducted the research in Northern California using blood samples from 246 mothers of children with autism and of a control group of 149 mothers of children without autism to examine their reactivity with the candidate antigens.

Seven antigens were significantly more reactive to the blood of mothers of children with autism than to that of the control mothers. The study found that the mothers with antibodies that reacted with any one of these antigens, either individually or in combination with other antigens, were more than three times as likely to have a child with autism spectrum disorder. 

Several combinations of antibodies in the blood from mothers of children with autism were not found in the control mothers’ blood. Nearly 23 percent of mothers of children with autism had certain combinations of autoantibodies against the target antigens, compared with less than 1 percent of mothers of children without the disorder.

Judy Van de Water and collegue
Judy Van de Water and colleague

The specific antigens identified in the study are lactate dehydrogenase A and B, cypin (guanine deaminase), stress-induced phosphoprotein 1, collapsing response mediator proteins 1 and 2, and Y-box binding protein. All are found throughout the body, but also are expressed at significant levels in the human fetal brain and have established roles in neurodevelopment. For example, cypin is an enzyme that plays an important role in normal neurite branching, a fundamental function in the developing brain, whereas the CRMP proteins are critical later in neuron development for axon outgrowth. 

Maternal antibodies are known to cross the placenta during pregnancy and can be detected in a fetus as early as 13 weeks. By 30 weeks, maternal antibody levels in the fetus are about half that of the mother, and at birth, the concentration is even greater in the newborn than in the mother herself. The maternal antibodies stay in the baby’s bloodstream for about 6 months after birth, after which the baby’s own immune system takes over. 

Once in the fetal bloodstream, the antibodies then may enter the brain and attack cells that have corresponding proteins that act as antigens. This antigen-antibody response is an important defense against foreign invaders, such as bacteria or viruses, but is not normally directed against oneself. When directed against one’s own tissue, the antibodies are known as autoantibodies.

"It is important to note that women have no control over whether or not they develop these autoantibodies, much like any other autoimmune disorder," Van de Water said. "And, like other autoimmune disorders, we do not know what the initial trigger is that leads to their production."

Understanding which proteins and which pathways are implicated in MAR autism can help elucidate the causes of autism and possibly lead to new therapies, such as administering ‘antibody blockers’ to the mother during pregnancy to prevent damage to the developing fetal brain, Van de Water said.

These findings are leading to the development of a MAR diagnostic test for autism, which would be available to the mothers of young children who are showing signs of developmental delay. If the test were positive, the child would be a candidate for early behavioral intervention. 

"These findings are incredibly important because they establish a cause for a significant portion of autism cases, thereby opening up new lines of inquiry into possible biological treatments,” said MIND Institute Director Leonard Abbeduto. “In addition, the findings demonstrate that a diagnostic test is within reach. This test would be invaluable for women who are considering becoming pregnant and could lead to earlier and more accurate diagnosis of children with developmental challenges and help get them into behavioral interventions at younger ages.”

Isaac Pessah © UC Regents
Isaac Pessah

A MAR diagnostic test also would assess a mother’s risk of having a child with autism prior to conception, which is particularly important for women who already have a child with the disorder. UC Davis has patented this technology and licensed the exclusive worldwide rights to develop it for commercial purposes to Pediatric Bioscience, Inc.   

“We know that early behavioral interventions for autism are critical,” said Isaac Pessah, professor and chair of the Department of Molecular Biosciences in the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and former director of the UC Davis Center for Children's Environmental Health. “Developing a predictive test for autism before symptoms become obvious could have an enormous impact on treating children with the condition.” 

Study participants were from the CHARGE (Childhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) study, an ongoing study that was launched in 2001 by the MIND Institute and the UC Davis Center for Children’s Environmental Health, of which Van de Water now is director. Children with autism spectrum disorder, children with developmental delay and typically developing children between the ages of 2 and 5 years are studied with the goal of better understanding the causes of autism. 

A related study is the MARBLES (Markers of Autism Risk in Babies ― Learning Early Signs) study, also being conducted at the MIND Institute and the Center for Children’s Environmental Health. This study follows pregnant women who already have a child with autism. Multiple factors related to genetics and the environment is under study in an effort to uncover predictors for having a child with autism.

Van de Water said knowing the specific protein targets of the maternal antibodies enables researchers to develop more precise animal models of autism. 

The study was funded by NIEHS grants P01 ES11269-01 and 1 R01-ES015359; United States Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program grant R829388; the UC Davis MIND Institute; and an Autism Speaks graduate fellowship.

Other authors include Daniel Braunschweig, Paula Krakowiak, Paul Duncanson, Robert Boyce, Robin Hansen, Paul Ashwood and Irva Hertz-Picciotto, all of UC Davis. 

At the UC Davis MIND Institute, world-renowned scientists engage in collaborative, interdisciplinary research to find the causes of and develop treatments and cures for autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fragile X syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. For more information, visit mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information