Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Flash-heating breastmilk to inactivate HIV is feasible for ...
Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



NEWS | May 1, 2012

Flash-heating breastmilk to inactivate HIV is feasible for women in resource-poor countries, UC Davis study finds

Editor's note:

For b-roll of the flash-heating process, e-mail karen.finney@ucdmc.ucdavis.eduClick here to view release en español.

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

An international team led by UC Davis researchers has found that mothers in sub-Saharan Africa could successfully follow a protocol for flash-heating breastmilk to reduce transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -- the virus that causes AIDS -- to their infants.

Flash-heating breastmilk is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for HIV-infected mothers during times of increased transmission risk. The technique involves expressing breastmilk into a glass jar that is placed in a small pot of water and heated until the water boils.

Mother feeding infant ©
UC Davis research shows that women in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, could flash heat their breast milk to reduce the chances of HIV transmission.

Previous research from UC Davis and UC Berkeley showed that this process inactivates HIV in breastmilk, while retaining the milk's nutritional and infection-fighting properties. But whether or not women in poor countries would be willing and able to successfully use the technique had not been established.

Published in the May issue of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, the current study showed that women in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania -- a resource-poor urban area -- could follow the protocol consistently over an average of about 10 weeks, with some mothers utilizing the method up to a full year.

"More women with HIV than we anticipated were willing and able to flash heat their breastmilk and make it safe despite very limited resources," said Caroline Chantry, professor of pediatrics at UC Davis Children's Hospital and lead author of the study. "These findings show that the World Health Organization's recommendations are feasible in a real-world setting."

Even in the absence of HIV medications, HIV-positive mothers in resource-poor regions are advised to exclusively breastfeed their children for six months. When compared to partial breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding can reduce the chances of mother-to-child HIV transmission during the first months of life. Physicians believe this is because mixed feeds increase the likelihood of allergens or contaminants that compromise the epithelial lining of a baby's digestive tract, making it easier for HIV to pass through. But while longer-term breastfeeding substantially increases the likelihood of HIV transmission, early cessation of breastfeeding is associated with high morbidity and mortality in developing areas.

"It's a very high-risk period for diseases and deaths from gastrointestinal infections," Chantry said. "Flash heating can help women provide nutrient and antibody-rich breastmilk to their infants beyond 6 months of age and reduce the possibility of HIV transmission at the same time."

To find out if women would use the protocol, Chantry and her team enrolled 101 HIV-infected mothers and their infants in the study: 86 infants were still alive and participating in the study at 5 months of age when the infants were tested for HIV. Of these infants, 72 were HIV negative, and more than half of their mothers chose to flash heat their breastmilk.

Peer counselors provided the necessary equipment and then visited the mothers weekly to offer instructions on flash heating and observe how well they followed the protocol, which included washing their hands, cleaning utensils, bringing the milk to the correct temperature (typically 72.9° C) and then allowing it to cool before feeding it to children with a spoon or cup.

"These mothers succeeded in flash heating with only modest support from trained peer counselors rather than professional health-care providers," Chantry said. "This method is inexpensive in terms of costs and workforce and could be sustainable in resource-limited settings."

Untreated and flash-heated breastmilk samples were collected every two weeks for bacterial analysis. The flash-heated milk was found to be bacteriologically safe.

Chantry said that the study sets the stage for a clinical trial to determine whether flash heating improves infant-health outcomes and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of health improvements in addition to averted HIV infections.

"Our focus is on improving both HIV-free 'thrival' as well as HIV-free survival," Chantry said. "WHO has also called for research on the feasibility of supporting and sustaining this practice on a large scale."

In addition to Chantry, study authors were Sera Young, Janet Peerson and Kathryn Dewey of UC Davis; Waverly Rennie, Monica Ngonyani, Clara Mashio and Margaret Nyambo of University Research Company, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Kiersten Israel-Ballard and Peggy Koniz-Booher of PATH, Seattle; Mecky Matee of Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; and Deborah Ash of Academy for Educational Development, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

"Feasibility of Using Flash-Heated Breastmilk as an Infant Feeding Option for HIV-Exposed, Uninfected Infants after 6 Months of Age in Urban Tanzania" was funded by the National Institutes of Health (grant number R01HD057602). Reporters can request a copy of the study by e-mailing karen.finney@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu.

UC Davis Children's Hospital is the Sacramento region's only nationally ranked, comprehensive hospital for children, serving infants, children, adolescents and young adults with primary, subspecialty and critical care. It includes the Central Valley's only pediatric emergency department and level I pediatric trauma center, which offers the highest level of care for critically ill children. The 129-bed children's hospital includes the state-of-the-art 49-bed neonatal and 24-bed pediatric intensive care and pediatric cardiac intensive care units. With more than 120 physicians in 33 subspecialties, UC Davis Children's Hospital has more than 74,000 clinic and hospital visits and 13,000 emergency department visits each year. For more information, visit children.ucdavis.edu.

Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information