Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Pancreatic hormone linked with severe heart disease in ...
Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information



NEWS | February 16, 2012

Pancreatic hormone linked with severe heart disease in obese and diabetic patients

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

Severe heart damage in people who are obese and diabetic is linked with a pancreatic hormone called amylin, UC Davis researchers have found.

In the failing hearts of patients who were obese and diabetic, the scientists discovered strings of proteins, small fibers and plaques made of amylin, the hormone that produces the feeling of being full after eating. They also showed in an animal model that amylin accumulation in the heart leads to heart muscle destruction and failure.

Published in the February 17 issue of the journal Circulation Research, the study also found amylin buildup in overweight patients who are not obese, suggesting the potentially dangerous accumulations may start before a diabetes diagnosis.

Heart failure is the number-one killer in obese and diabetic populations. Controlling the circulation of amylin hormone in the blood might lessen or prevent disabilities and deaths from heart disease, the scientists said.

Despa Florin © UC Regents
Florin Despa

"Amylin appears to be a stealth killer," said Florin Despa, an assistant professor of pharmacology at UC Davis and senior author of the study. "There is only one amylin protein for every 100 insulin proteins in the blood, so it has been under the radar until recently."

In healthy people, amylin circulates in the blood together with insulin --the hormone that controls carbohydrate and fat metabolism --  and principally regulates gastric fluxes and the sensation of satiety.

In studies of both normal and failing donated hearts of people undergoing heart-transplant surgery, the researchers found little or no amylin accumulation in lean people. But a quite different picture emerged from examinations of heart tissue of obese and type 2 diabetic patients. In failing hearts of these patients, they found extensive accumulation of amylin in strings of 10 to 20 proteins called oligomers. They detected a smaller but still abnormal buildup in nonfailing hearts from patients who were overweight but not obese.

Using genetically engineered rats that secrete human amylin in the same proportion as it is found in obese people, the researchers determined that amylin oligomers attach to membranes of myocytes -- the heart-muscle cells that control heart beats. This made the membranes more porous to calcium, which changed myocyte contractility, altered the expression of vital proteins and, eventually, caused heart muscle cells to die.

"The significantly altered cardiac myocyte structure and function in the rats, along with the high levels of oligomers in the human heart tissue, strongly suggest that amylin is a major contributor to heart failure in obese and diabetic patients," Despa said.

Despa thinks that the link between cardiac amylin accumulation and heart disease has been overlooked because amylin circulates in relatively small amounts in blood, and because animals, including rats, that are often used in most studies of diabetic cardiac dysfunction do not normally express the form of amylin that aggregates and builds up in tissues.

The scientists now hope to find ways to curb amylin buildup in the heart before it has the chance to destroy muscle tissue.

"Drugs that block amylin from forming into toxic oligomers could significantly reduce the chances of heart failure," Despa said.

For the research, amylin protein accumulation was detected in human and rat heart tissues and cell cultures using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and Western blot. Heart dysfunction in the rats was identified by studying the physiological performance of isolated myocytes and by measuring the expression of tell-tale proteins that deform cardiac muscle. The researchers used echocardiography and measurements of blood flow to assess heart tissue structure and performance and changes in myocardium contractions.

The lead researcher on the study was Sanda Despa, an assistant professor of pharmacology at UC Davis. Other UC Davis authors were Le Chen, postdoctoral scientist in the pharmacology department; Anne Knowlton and Donald Bers, professors in the pharmacology department; and Peter Havel, professor of molecular biosciences with the School of Veterinary Medicine.

Additional authors were Kenneth Margulies, professor in the Cardiovascular Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, and Heinrich Taegtmeyer, professor of the internal medicine department at the University of Texas School of Medicine.

The research was funded by the American Heart Association, National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health and a Vision Grant from the National Board of Advisors of UC Davis Health System. The genetically engineered rats used in the study were provided by Pfizer.

The UC Davis School of Medicine is among the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. The school offers fully accredited master's degree programs in public health and in informatics, and its combined M.D.-Ph.D. program is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care. Along with being a recognized leader in medical research, the school is committed to serving underserved communities and advancing rural health. For more information, visit UC Davis School of Medicine website at medschool.ucdavis.edu.

Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean | UC Davis Health System

Healing sick and injured people is both an enormous responsibility and honor. Each year at UC Davis Health System, we care for tens of thousands of patients and train hundreds of students and residents to be compassionate, skilled caregivers. My leadership teams and I are committed to values-based leadership, which includes inclusivity, collaboration and integrity.

This is an exciting time at UC Davis Health System as we are creating a new roadmap for our future. Our next strategic plan will focus on six pillars: transforming care, transforming education, accelerating innovative research, improving population health, changing culture, and setting priorities.

As Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences and Dean of the School of Medicine, I am excited to lead UC Davis Health System forward. And because I am committed to inclusion excellence, I value the partnership of our talented faculty, students, residents and staff, as well as our local and global communities. Together, we are forging new paths in research, health-professional education and patient care.

Julie A. Freischlag, M.D., FACS
Vice Chancellor for Human Health Sciences
Dean, School of Medicine

UC Davis School of Medicine is one of the nation's leading medical schools, recognized for its research and primary-care programs. Ranked 34th in National Institutes of Health funding in 2013, it is designated as one of the nation’s inaugural Clinical Translational Science Centers.

A few highlights include:

  • A national reputation for life-changing biomedical discoveries
  • A passion for clinical care and a commitment to engaging people from underserved communities and advancing rural health
  • Fully accredited master’s degree programs in public health and in informatics
  • A combined M.D.-Ph.D. program that is training the next generation of physician-scientists to conduct high-impact research and translate discoveries into better clinical care

The Dean’s Departments and Offices include:

Additional departments:

To learn more, visit the medical school site.

UC Davis Medical Center, based in Sacramento, Calif., is a nationally renowned academic medical center where clinical practice, teaching and research converge to advance human health.

A few highlights:

  • A 619-bed multispecialty academic medical center
  • Serves 33 counties covering a 65,000-square-mile area north to the Oregon border and east to Nevada
  • Recognized as one of the “Most Wired” hospitals in the U.S.
  • Recognized by The Leapfrog Group as a “Top Hospital” for delivery of high-quality care
  • Ranked Sacramento's top hospital by U.S. News & World Report

Centers of excellence include:

  • UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive centers nationwide
  • State-of-the-art emergency departments that include the region's only Level I adult and pediatric trauma centers
  • The internationally recognized UC Davis MIND Institute, devoted to finding treatments and cures for neurodevelopmental disorders
  • UC Davis Children's Hospital, a nationally ranked pediatric hospital with more than 120 physicians in 33 pediatric subspecialties
  • A pioneering telehealth program, which gives remote, underserved communities access to academic specialty and subspecialty care

To learn more, visit the medical center site.

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis cultivates academic excellence and addresses urgent, societal needs through leadership development, interprofessional education, transformative research, cultural inclusiveness and innovative technology. The school plays a critical role in preparing nurse leaders who will shape the future of health care and inform health policy.

The School of Nursing has five research focus areas: chronic disease management, health technology, pain management, Healthy People and Healthy Systems. Faculty come from a wide range of backgrounds including nursing, business administration, sociology, gerontology, medicine, information technology and psychology. School of Nursing students engage in classroom and clinical environments with students in the School of Medicine, health informatics and other health-related programs.

A few highlights include:

To learn more, visit the School of Nursing’s website.

The Practice Management Group (TPMG) represents all organized medical group practices of UC Davis Health System’s primary and specialty care faculty physicians. The group's purpose is to serve the health system’s missions through high-quality, cost-effective care delivery. By delegation from the Office of the Vice Chancellor and Dean, TPMG has shared responsibility for the clinical operations of the health system's professional practice activities.

The formation of TPMG is an important step in formalizing the leadership of the health system's medical group practices and in refining the role of its group practice in achieving the health system's research, teaching, patient care and community engagement goals. Its primary goal is to maintain a clinical practice that distinguishes UC Davis Health System as a leading faculty and academic health center.

Specific goals of TPMG include:

  • Increasing efficiency of practice and revenue
  • Decreasing practice expenses
  • Reducing silos and improving integration
  • Identifying areas to increase quality
  • Aligning incentives

David H. Wisner is the executive director of the Practice Management Group, overseeing faculty practice operations as well as the overall vision and strategic direction of TPMG and its day-to-day activities. Wisner collaborates with the leadership of the School of Medicine and medical center to set and achieve joint strategic goals across the health system.

More information