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Continuing Medical Education

Continuing Medical Education

NEWS | April 1, 2014

UC Davis nursing school welcomes physician assistant, nurse practitioner students to clinical training

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.)

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis conducted a White Coat Ceremony on Monday to celebrate the formal transition from classroom education to clinical preparation for physician assistant and nurse practitioner Class of 2015 students.

Nurse practitioner and physician assistant faculty Shelly Henderson, left,  and Debra Bakerjian, right, help physician assistant student Elizabeth Bradbury, middle,  put on her new coat as part of the White Coat Ceremony Monday at the School of  Nursing. Nurse practitioner and physician assistant faculty Shelly Henderson, left, and Debra Bakerjian, right, help physician assistant student Elizabeth Bradbury, middle, put on her new coat as part of the White Coat Ceremony Monday at the School of Nursing.

More than 100 family and friends filled the Robert T. Matsui Lecture Hall at UC Davis Health System’s Education Building to cheer on the six nurse practitioner and 21 physician assistant students as they were presented their first white coats.

Similar to the white coat tradition at many medical programs, the ceremony signifies the completion of the academic year of study and the move to clinical education, where students complete rotations in primary care, inpatient medicine, rural medicine, pediatrics, surgery and other areas. During this time, students experience their first patient interactions.

“In keeping with the concept that medicine, and health care in general, are team sports, this tradition has expanded to a variety of other health professions such as pharmacy, optometry, therapy, veterinary, physician assistant and advanced practice nursing, and is now celebrated internationally,” said Debra Bakerjian, senior director for the nurse practitioner and physician assistant programs.

The event included comments and advice from two program alumni — Karimeh Borghei, a 2006 nurse practitioner graduate and Jeremy Meis, a 2012 graduate of the physician assistant program — as well as a current physician assistant student, Kim Ward, and other faculty.

The UC Davis physician assistant and nurse practitioner programs are the only ones in the nation where the two professions learn together in the classroom. Additionally, the UC Davis programs focus on developing providers to deliver care in areas where it’s needed most, thus expanding access for a growing population. The UC Davis School of Medicine’s Department of Community and Family Medicine first offered a nurse practitioner graduate certificate program in 1970. The physician assistant program was added in 1982.

In 2013, the program was reconfigured into master’s degree programs at the UC Davis nursing school. Over the past 40 years, UC Davis has graduated more than 1,800 nurse practitioners and physician assistants, with 67 percent of graduates working in underserved areas. Additionally, nearly 70 percent of graduates work in primary care, compared to significantly lower national averages of between 30 and 40 percent.

“In a few short months, you will all be spending the majority of your time in health care practices, in emergency rooms, operating rooms, inpatient settings, and ambulatory care settings in inner cities and in remote rural areas” Bakerjian said. “You will begin caring for people of all ages, from diverse backgrounds, with and without adequate resources, and with acute and chronic illnesses. This is both an awesome responsibility and an incredible privilege, and the next many months will prepare you to be ready for the roles of physician assistant and nurse practitioner.”

Learn more about the graduate nurse practitioner and physician assistant programs at the School of Nursing by visiting online at nursing.ucdavis.edu.

About the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis
The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis was established in March 2009 through a $100 million commitment from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the nation's largest grant for nursing education. The vision of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing is to transform health care through nursing education and research. The school’s first programs, doctoral and master’s degrees, opened in fall 2010. Master’s degree programs for nurse practitioners and physician assistants, with a focus on preparing primary-care providers for rural and underserved communities, opened in summer 2013. The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing is part of UC Davis Health System, an integrated, academic health system encompassing the UC Davis School of Medicine, UC Davis Medical Center and the UC Davis Medical Group. For more information, visit nursing.ucdavis.edu.