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Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine

News releases

December 2015arrow

Knuckle cracking looks explosive, but causes no detectable harm

December 1, 2015

UC Davis Health System research presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America in Chicago helps resolve two persistent questions about knuckle cracking: What causes the “crack” sound, and does it damage the hand?

November 2015arrow

UC Davis researchers find success in tele-audiology program

November 24, 2015

Researchers at UC Davis have shown that the California Tele-Audiology Program (CTP), which provides follow-up diagnostic evaluations for infants who did not pass their initial newborn hearing test, dramatically improves access to audiologists. [en español]

Common pigeon: Not just a bird brain, but a brainy bird

November 18, 2015

If pigeons went to medical school and specialized in pathology or radiology, they’d be pretty good at distinguishing digitized microscope slides and mammograms of normal vs. cancerous breast tissue, a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis and The University of Iowa has found.

Lam receives $4 million in NIH grants for novel cancer research

November 18, 2015

Kit Lam, professor and chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, has been awarded two major, multi-disciplinary U01 grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the first to investigate use of a new tool to visualize cancer tumor growth and response to nanoparticle drugs, and the other to develop a new 4-D imaging tool to advance the understanding of how the nucleus functions in living cells.

Small RNA has big impact on prostate cancer

November 17, 2015

Researchers at the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center have shown that the microRNA, miR-124, reduced tumor growth and increased cell death in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

Statewide cancer report finds significant disparities in outcomes, quality of care by insurer

November 5, 2015

A new report by the UC Davis Institute for Population Health Improvement (IPHI) comparing quality of care and outcomes for breast, colon, rectal, lung and prostate cancers according to source of health insurance coverage has identified substantial disparities in stage of diagnosis, providers’ use of recommended treatment and survival rates.

New technology will help define the environmental triggers of childhood asthma

November 4, 2015

UC Davis researchers have received a four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a small, wearable sensor that can measure the relationship between environmental exposures and pediatric asthma.

October 2015arrow

MIND Institute offers program for adults with autism spectrum disorder

October 29, 2015

Researchers with the Behavioral Health Center of Excellence and MIND Institute at UC Davis are seeking adult participants, aged 18 to 38 years and diagnosed with or suspected of having autism or Asperger’s disorder, to participate in a research study, the ACCESS Program (Acquiring Career, Coping, Executive-Function and Social Skills Program).

Menopausal status a better indicator than age for mammography frequency

October 20, 2015

In a study conducted to inform American Cancer Society breast cancer screening guidelines, UC Davis researcher Diana L. Miglioretti reports a screening mammogram once every two years is safe for postmenopausal women at average risk of breast cancer.

Bilingual website boosts awareness of kidney transplantation and donation among Hispanics/Latinos

October 7, 2015

A new bilingual website sensitive to Hispanic/Latino cultural needs increases knowledge about living kidney donation and transplantation beyond standard education provided by transplant centers, a new study published Oct. 7 in the journal Transplantation has found. [en español]

UC Davis granted $15.5 million to build world's first total-body PET scanner

October 6, 2015

A UC Davis research team has been awarded $15.5 million to build the world’s first total-body positron emission tomography (PET) scanner, which could fundamentally change the way cancers are tracked and treated and put the university on the nation’s leading edge of molecular imaging.