Overview

In its commitment to cultivating diverse, transdisciplinary, life-long learners who will lead transformation in health care to advance well-being and equity for all, the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences offers a one-year Clinical Child Psychology Doctoral Internship (two positions) and a one-year Clinical Child Psychology Postdoctoral Fellowship (two positions). Our doctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship programs in clinical child psychology offer interns and fellows the best of both worlds: training from a strong academic approach that emphasizes evidence-based treatment within the context of providing complex clinical work in a community mental health outpatient setting. In cooperation with Sacramento County Health and Human Services Division of Behavioral Health, UC Davis clinical faculty and psychiatry residents and fellows, our clinical child psychology interns and fellows will receive their training and provide direct psychological services at the Sacramento County Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Services (CAPS) Clinic. The CAPS Clinic is a community mental health outpatient clinic, which serves diverse Sacramento County Medi-Cal/EPSDT child (ages 0-21) and family recipients.

Following a developmentally appropriate, culturally sensitive, and trauma-informed systems approach to client care, interns develop skills throughout the training year in order to provide direct clinical services that include: therapy (individual, group, family, dyadic), assessment (intakes, screening, and integrated psychological testing), and consultation. Interns and fellows also coordinate and collaborate with several professionals involved in the client’s care, including those working in the mental health, medical, academic, and legal domains.

The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences has over 80 faculty members, including 10 psychologists. Psychologists in our department represent a wide array of clinical and research interests and expertise. Several psychologists within the Department participate in federally funded research programs that investigate the basic mechanisms of brain function, neurodevelopment, clinical studies in child and adult psychiatry, and specific psychiatric disorders, such as autism and psychosis. Four attending psychologists participate in the postdoctoral training program in clinical psychology. These psychologists represent an array of theoretical approaches, including family systems, psychodynamic, interpersonal, and cognitive-behavioral. Clinically, they have expertise in psychotherapy and comprehensive psychological assessment with infants, children, adolescents, and adults from culturally and ethnically diverse backgrounds who present with complex clinical presentations. In addition to our full-time faculty, which includes Stacey Peerson, Ph.D., Carlina Wheeler, Ph.D., Richelle Long, Ph.D., and Elizabeth Solomon, Psy.D., our program includes several volunteer clinical faculty members representing a wide range of training and experience in areas including law and ethics, development throughout the lifespan, relational psychoanalysis, psychological evaluation of special populations, multicultural competence, and forensic psychology. These psychologists practice in private, community, and educational settings and provide clinical supervision to both child and adult psychology and psychiatry fellows and residents.

  • Candace Adams, Ph.D. is an associate clinical professor and co-leads our assessment case conference seminar.
  • Lisa Farquhar, Ph.D. is a clinical professor and co-leads our therapy case conference seminar. Her clinical background has primarily focused on development across the lifespan.
  • Steven McCormick, Ph.D. is an assistant clinical professor and provides training in psychological assessment at our assessment case conference. He has a private practice in the community that focuses on providing evaluation and treatment for persons with acquired cognitive dysfunction, chronic pain syndrome, and psychological disturbance secondary to traumas. He received his B.S. in psychology at Oregon State University and obtained his Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology in Berkeley. He has research publications in the area of traumatic brain injury and is a member of the National Academy of Neuropsychology, APA Division of Clinical Neuropsychology, and the American Academy of Pain Management.