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The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing

The Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing

Impact series

Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing graduate students and faculty are already impacting the value and quality of care in innovative ways. This series is a personal peek into their goals, research and future plans.

Anita Depatie, R.N., M.S.
Master of Science Class of 2013
Most adults who are 65 or older say they want to continue living at home as long as possible. Research by Anita Depatie, a nurse and alumna of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis, investigates how innovative technology may enable older adults to do just that.

Christy Solorio, R.N., M.S.
Master of Science Class of 2013
Is there a link between childhood obesity and household eating practices in which parents instruct their children to “clean their plates?” And is the way parents feed their children influenced by household circumstances in which access to adequate food is consistently lacking? These are some of the questions that master’s-degree student Christy Solorio is trying to answer through her thesis research.

Amy Doroy, R.N., M.S.
Master of Science Class of 2012
Doctor of Philosophy Class of 2016
In her first year as a graduate student at the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing, Amy Doroy developed a unique job-shadowing program where medical students spend a day with registered nurses in a critical care unit at UC Davis Medical Center, where she is also a nurse manager. The experience was part of a School of Medicine pilot program, the 2011 Race and Health Institute.

Amy Doroy
 

Charley Johnston, R.N., M.S.
Master of Science Class of 2012
In his new job, Charley Johnston--an inaugural graduate of the School of Nursing--has shifted his focus from providing high-quality care to individuals to improving the quality and safety for everyone in his hospital unit. Equipping health-care professionals with the knowledge and skills needed to effect system-level change--a step that improves direct, bedside care--is just what the School of Nursing set out to accomplish.

 

Katherine Kim, M.P.H., M.B.A.
Doctor of Philosophy Class of 2014
Emerging and new technologies, such as cell phones, social media and data management systems, could provide solutions to complex health-care issues. Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing doctoral student Katherine Kim discovers how such technology can improve the quality, safety and cost-effectiveness of health care.

 Katherine Kim