Stephen Noctor, Ph.D. - IDDRC Investigator

Stephen Noctor, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UC Davis School of Medicine
2825 50th Street, Room 2414
Sacramento, CA 95817 



Phone: 916-703-0435 / Fax: 916-703-0367
E-mail: cnoctor@ucdavis.edu 

Areas of Interest

Fragile X Premutation, Autism, Schizophrenia, Cortical Development, Neural Precursor Cells, Neurogenesis

Research

Dr. Stephen Noctor investigates development of the cerebral cortex under normal and pathological conditions.  Studies in the Noctor lab center on factors that regulate the production of neural and glial cells, and the migration of newborn neurons. Current projects are focused on how neural-immune interactions in the prenatal brain regulate precursor cell function. Additional work in the lab is identifying and phenotyping cortical neural precursor cells in the fetal non-human primate model. 

Current IDDRC Projects

  • Microglia regulate development of the cerebral cortex, NIMH/NIH, R01 MH101188

Recent Representative Publications

Cunningham CL, Martinez-Cerdeno V, Noctor SC (2013) Microglia regulate the number of neural precursor cells in the developing cerebral cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 33(10): 4216-4233.

Cunningham CL, Martinez-Cerdeno V, Noctor SC (2013). Diversity of neural precursor cell types in the prenatal macaque cerebral cortex exists largely within the astroglial cell lineage. PLoS One, 8(5): e63848.

Cunningham CL, Martinez-Cerdeño V, Navarro E, Prakash A, Willemsen R, Hagerman PJ, Pessah IN, Berman RF, Noctor SC. (2011). Premutation CGG-repeat expansion of the Fmr1 gene impairs mouse neocortical development. Human Molecular Genetics, 20(1): 64-79.

Noctor SC, Flint AC, Weissman TA, Dammerman RS, Kriegstein AR. (2001). Neurons derived from radial glial cells establish radial units in neocortex. Nature; 409:714-720.

Noctor SC, Martínez-Cerdeño V, Ivic L, Kriegstein AR. (2004). Cortical neurons arise in symmetric and asymmetric division zones and migrate through specific phases. Nature Neuroscience; 7:136-44.