2018

Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) F30 Predoctoral Fellowship

Satya Dandekar, Ph.D.Satya Dandekar, Ph.D.

Katti HorngKatti Horng
   

The Medical Microbiology and Immunology Department at UC Davis would like to congratulate student, Katti Horng, on receiving the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Services Award (NRSA) F30 Predoctoral Fellowship. She is the second student at UC Davis and the first student at the School of Veterinary Medicine to have been awarded this prestigious award. The purpose of the Kirschstein-NRSA, dual-doctoral degree, predoctoral fellowship (F30) is to enhance the integrated research and clinical training of promising predoctoral students, who are matriculated in a combined MD/PhD or other dual-doctoral degree training program (e.g. DO/PhD, DDS/PhD, AuD/PhD, DVM/PhD), and who intend careers as physician/clinician-scientists. The NIH support will fund 3 years of her DVM/PhD training at UC Davis. Katti is a graduate student in the Graduate Group of Integrative Pathobiology, where she plays an active role in representing the graduate student body at UC Davis. As a budding clinician scientist, her PhD work in the laboratory of Dr. Satya Dandekar is focused on understanding how the gastrointestinal tract is targeted during HIV infection and developing novel strategies to repair gut damage alongside anti-retroviral therapies. She has given presentations at national (Merial-NIH, dual-degree colloquiums) as well as international meetings (FASEB, Keystone). When Katti is not engaged in science, she can be found outdoors with her fiance and 2 furry children exploring the 58 national parks in America.

Immune system and gastrointestinal deregulation linked with autism

Paul Ashwood, Ph.D.Paul Ashwood, Ph.D.

Destanie RoseDestanie Rose
   

Dr. Paul Ashwood's lab has a new publication in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. The first author of the paper was Destanie Rose, a graduate student in the laboratory of Paul Ashwood.

Their research has found that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have reduced immune system regulation, as well as shifts in their gut microbiota. The immune deregulation appears to facilitate increased inflammation and may be linked to the gastrointestinal issues so often experienced by children with ASD.

Read more about this research publication here »

New publication has been highlighted in the Journal of Immunology

Barbara Shacklett, Ph.D.Barbara Shacklett, Ph.D.

Brenna Kiniry, Ph.D.Brenna Kiniry, Ph.D.

Dr. Barbara Shacklett's lab has a new publication in the Journal of Immunology that was selected by the journal for a special feature. The first author of the paper was Brenna Kiniry, PhD, a recent graduate of the Microbiology Graduate Group from Dr. Shacklett’s lab.

The articles highlighted in the Journal of Immunology are considered to be among the top 10% of articles published in the journal.

Read more about this feature highlight here » (PDF)

Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) F30 Predoctoral Fellowship

Andreas Bäumler, Ph.D.Andreas Bäumler, Ph.D.

Lillian ZhangLillian Zhang
   

Lillian Zhang, an MD/PhD candidate in the lab of Dr. Andreas Bäumler has been awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) F30 Predoctoral Fellowship. Lillian is the first student in the history of UC Davis to have been awarded this prestigious fellowship.

The purpose of the Kirschstein-NRSA, dual-doctoral degree, predoctoral fellowship (F30) is to enhance the integrated research and clinical training of promising predoctoral students, who are matriculated in a combined MD/PhD or other dual-doctoral degree training program, and who intend careers as physician/clinician-scientists.

2017

Maternal immune response affects genes in microglia, neural development

Janine LaSalle, Ph.D.Janine LaSalle, Ph.D.

Annie Vogel CierniaAnnie Vogel Ciernia

UC Davis MIND Institute researchers have shown in a mouse model that an elevated maternal immune response changes the epigenetic landscape in offspring’s microglia, immune cells found in the brain and spinal cord. These changes affect genes associated with immune signaling and neural development, some of which have been implicated in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study was published online in the journal Glia.

“The genes we identified that had differences in methylation and changes in expression showed an overlap or enrichment for genes that had been identified as genetic risk factors for autism, as well as genes that were differentially expressed in autism human brain samples,” said Annie Vogel Ciernia, Autism Research Training Program (ARTP) fellow, senior postdoctoral researcher in the LaSalle lab at UC Davis and first author on the paper.

Read more about this news article »

Read more about this news on UC Davis Health Newsroom »

 

Outstanding Senior in the Global Disease Biology major

Satya Dandekar, Ph.D.Satya Dandekar, Ph.D.

Don NguyenDon Nguyen
   

Don Nguyen, an undergraduate researcher from Dr. Satya Dandekar's lab, has been named "Outstanding Senior in the Global Disease Biology major". This award recognizes students' contributions to the intellectual environment of their department, through involvement in research or classroom discussion, leadership in student groups committed to the advancement of learning, or other intellectual pursuits with faculty and fellow students.

The Global Disease Biology academic major at UC Davis uses an integrated, One Health-based approach to advance student understanding of the concept(s) of disease, the societal and personal impacts of past, present and future diseases, and the science behind disease discoveries, causes, evolution, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. This major is offered by College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and is partnered with School of Medicine and School of Veterinary Medicine.