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Clinical and Translational Science Center

Clinical and Translational Science Center

Center for Reducing Health Disparities

Resource List - Racial/Ethnic Data

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Asian American Data

Asian Tobacco Education and Cancer Awareness Research Population Network – A Model for Reducing Asian American Cancer Health Disparities
Uninsured and underserved Asian Americans are vulnerable to cancer health disparities due to inherent cultural and linguistic barriers that prevent them from utilizing mainstream healthcare systems.  Asian Tobacco Education and Cancer Awareness Research (ATECAR) is a community-based network that has empowered Asian communities through infrastructure building, creating sustainable partnerships, and providing technical assistance.  These efforts are based on the ATECAR logic model which includes a needs assessment, partnership building, training, mentorship, evaluation, and diffusion with community involvement at every level.

Asian Americans and Cancer Clinical Trials. A Mixed-Methods Approach to Understanding Awareness and Experience 
(UCD Authors)
Barriers to recruitment of minority populations affect the generalizability and impact of clinical trial findings for those populations.  A survey was administered to new cancer patients.  Comparison of survey results for Asian-American respondents and non-Asian respondents indicated that Asians were less likely to have heard the term “clinical trial” and were more likely to define a clinical trial as “an experiment” or “a test procedure in a clinic” than non-Asians.  Multiple strategies will be necessary to enhance awareness of and experience with accrual to cancer clinical trials for Asians.

The Future of Children. Children of Immigrant Families. 
Volume 14 – Number 2. The David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Summer 2004.
Regardless of how one might feel about immigration, there is no turning back the clock on the children of immigrants already living here, most of whom are U.S. citizens.  In the report, the strengths and challenges that set children of immigrant families apart from the mainstream population are explored. For example, compared with children of U.S.-born parents, children of immigrants are more likely to be born healthier and to live with both parents. They also are more likely to be living in poverty and to be without health insurance. Although indicators of child well-being vary widely based on the family’s country of origin, the overall trends are dominated by the large number of immigrants from Mexico, Asia, Central America, and the Caribbean. The report describes the circumstances and needs of two groups in particular—Latinos and Southeast Asians.

Health Centers’ Role in Reducing Health Disparities among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.
January 2005.
This Fact Sheet talks about health disparities among AAPI populations.  It found that this population has a lack of access to regular care; less satisfaction with care; fewer preventive services; poorer quality care; and higher disease incidence.

Diverse Communities, Diverse Experiences – The Status of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the U.S. – A Review of Six Socioeconomic Indicators and Their Impact on Health.  
Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF).
Socioeconomic status affects health through many pathways including: access and quality of health care, health behaviors, psychosocial processes, physical environment, and social environment.  The 6 socioeconomic indicators that influence health status in the report are: language, income and poverty, educational attainment, immigration and citizenship, health workforce, and other household indicators.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and HIV/AIDS.  
Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF).
This health brief contains HIV/AIDS data for AAPI populations.  It discusses risk factors, prevalence, underreporting, misclassification, prevention, and opportunities for development.

Healthy People 2010: Data Gaps and Disparities for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.  
Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF).
A policy brief on the Department of Health and Human Services Healthy People 2010 Initiative and how to address the lack of information on Asians and Pacific Islanders.

Health Briefs on Specific Asian Communities in the US.  
Asian and Pacific Islander American Health Forum (APIAHF). 2006.
These Health Briefs contain health information and statistics for various Asian populations in the US: Cambodians, Chamorros, Chinese, Filipinos, Hmong, Japanese, Koreans, Native Hawaiians, Samoans, South Asians, and Vietnamese.

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Latino Data

Factors Associated with Hispanic/non-Hispanic White Colorectal Cancer Screening Disparities. (UCD Authors)
http://www.springerlink.com/content/w743513566361611/fulltext.pdf
In the United States, Hispanics are less likely to undergo colorectal cancer (CRC) screening than non-Hispanic whites (whites).  Factors associated with CRC screening disparities between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites appear similar among Hispanic sub-groups. However, the relative contribution of these factors to disparities varies by Hispanic national origin group, suggesting a need for differing approaches to increasing screening for each group (Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, or Dominican).

The Future of Children. Children of Immigrant Families.
Volume 14 – Number 2. The David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Summer 2004.
http://www.futureofchildren.org/usr_doc/Vol_14_No2_no_photos.pdf
Regardless of how one might feel about immigration, there is no turning back the clock on the children of immigrants already living here, most of whom are U.S. citizens.  In the report, the strengths and challenges that set children of immigrant families apart from the mainstream population are explored. For example, compared with children of U.S.-born parents, children of immigrants are more likely to be born healthier and to live with both parents. They also are more likely to be living in poverty and to be without health insurance. Although indicators of child well-being vary widely based on the family’s country of origin, the overall trends are dominated by the large number of immigrants from Mexico, Asia, Central America, and the Caribbean. The report describes the circumstances and needs of two groups in particular—Latinos and Southeast Asians.

Latino Health Fact Sheet.  Latino Coalition for a Healthy California (LCHC).
http://www.lchc.org/documents/QuickFactsonLatinoHealth.pdf
Includes data on uninsured rate, uninsured children, cultural and linguistic access to care, Medi-Cal, and the Healthy Families program.

Health Policy Fact Sheet.  Latino Coalition for a Healthy California (LCHC).
http://www.lchc.org/documents/HealthPolicyFactSheet01-24-03.pdf
Important health care issues for California Latinos: health insurance coverage, health status, usual source of care, and policy recommendations.

The California Latino – Demographics. Latino Coalition for a Healthy California (LCHC).
http://www.lchc.org/documents/PresentationreLatinoDemographics_000.pdf
Population, births, age, education, English proficiency, median wage, finances, insurance, access to health care.

Latino Health in California.  Latino Coalition for a Healthy California (LCHC).
http://www.lchc.org/documents/LatinoHealthinCA.pdf
Demographics, uninsured rate, immigrants, farm workers, health disparities, community health.

One Out of Three Latino Adolescents Overweight or At Risk.  Latino Coalition for a Healthy California (LCHC).
http://www.lchc.org/documents/FactSheet--LatinoObesity_000.pdf
Latino adolescents demonstrate highest prevalence of overweight.  Discussion of risk factors and policy solutions.

Mexican Immigrants Generally Healthier, but have Less Access to Needed Care.  Latino Coalition for a Healthy California (LCHC).
http://www.lchc.org/documents/MexicanImmigrantsGenerallyHealthier.pdf
Covers health status, access to care, use of services, policy implications

Diabetes and Mexicans: Why the Two Are Linked. Latino Coalition for a Healthy California (LCHC).
http://www.lchc.org/documents/MexicansandDiabetes.pdf
This essay focuses on Mexicans and the possible causes of the nutrition transition and the emergence of obesity in developing countries. It also talks about the Type 2 diabetes pandemic, ancestry and prenatal exposure, and how to address this issue.

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Native American Data

Health Status of American Indians in California.  
California Rural Indian Health Board (CRIHB), Inc. 2000. 
Fact sheet on births, deaths, prenatal care, diabetes prevalence, diabetes complications, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, preventable injuries.

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African American Data

Trends in Prostate Cancer Mortality among Black Men and White Men in the United States
Using prostate cancer incidence, survival, and incidence-based mortality rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program for the U.S. population, this study investigates the mechanism for declining prostate cancer mortality rates in the US.  Prostate cancer mortality rates declined sharply after 1991 for white men and after 1992 for black men.  The age adjusted mortality rates have dropped below the rate in 1986 since 1995 for white men and 1997 for black men.  This decrease reflects the increased use of prostate specific antigen testing which began in 1986.

The Health of African Americans in California.  
California Black Health Network (CBHN), Inc.
Demographics, infant mortality, HIV/AIDS, obesity, tobacco use, diabetes, heart disease and stroke, insurance coverage.

African American Health Statistics.  
California Black Health Network (CBHN), Inc.
This 2-page fact sheet focuses on those diseases that disproportionately affect the African American community: risk factors (diet, motivators and barriers, physical activity, overweight and obesity), chronic disease (heart disease, cancer, diabetes), and food security are discussed.

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