Dr. BerglundLars Berglund

In late 2006, UC Davis was honored to be among the first 12 institutions to receive a coveted NIH Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA), marking an important recognition of the rich, collaborative culture at UC Davis. During the years that followed, the consortium of CTSA academic research institutions has expanded to 62, located in 30 states and the District of Columbia. The grant, renewed in 2011 and 2016, is now one year into its 3rd 5-year funding period.

Initially the CTSC served as an incubator of ideas and a catalyst for partnerships at UC Davis and beyond. Today, the UC Davis CTSC offers a robust toolbox of resources that faculty, trainees and staff across the scientific and medical spectrum can use to enhance research and improve health and health-care delivery. Our mission is “building research teams of the future to improve human health.”

The CTSC generates and supports strong scientific projects, a well-developed cadre of translational trainees, and community partner-ships serving a broad range of investigators and research projects. Firmly embedded in the institutional framework, the CTSC serves as an honest and resourceful broker and efficient catalyst, collaborating with schools and colleges engaged in life science and translational research. During our decade-long existence, we have become an agent of change focusing on translational research and bringing value through a robust workforce development program, process facilitation and streamlining, and key shared functions such as informatics, biostatistics, and regulatory assistance.

I am extremely proud of the CTSC and believe strongly in its value, mission, and capability. I also recognize the contributions of staff and faculty leaders to the program. These efforts underscore one of my proudest achievements – a superb team that will ensure continued success of the CTSC. This support becomes even more important, since with increased responsibility as interim dean for the School of Medicine, I now find it necessary to relinquish my role as PI. My colleague, Ted Wun, M.D., has agreed to accept the role and continue the legacy.

Dr. Wun is a professor of medicine, division chief, and the associate dean of research at the UC Davis School of Medicine. I have had the extreme pleasure of working with Dr. Wun since the 1st CTSA grant and consider him to be a most suitable candidate to assume the role of PI for the CTSC. Dr. Wun has been a strong partner in research and excellent co-collaborator over the last 11 years, assuming various roles as best fit the need throughout our history. I believe he will drive the CTSC toward continued success with the mission of building research teams of the future to improve human health.