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UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center

Help beat lung cancer

News & Features

Lung cancer survivor, Gary Hinze, with wife, Sandie 

Meet lung cancer survivor Gary Hinze  

Musician attributes recovery to multidisciplinary cancer care.


View David Gandara in the Lung Cancer "Living Room".

Renowned oncologist discusses lung cancer screening and molecular fingerprinting as part of the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation's Patient Empowerment Education Series.


Drs. Mack and Gandara © 2010 UC Regents 

A custom fit for lung cancer treatment  

See why a Bay Area physician-turned-patient chose UC Davis for his care.

New Patient Support

Peer Navigator Program 

Peer navigator program provides one-to-one peer support  

This special program matches newly-diagnosed cancer patients with cancer survivors.

Related Resources

Become a volunteer specimen donor

How you can make a difference

lung cancer researchLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide.

By donating two tubes of blood and/or other optional specimen samples you can help UC Davis cancer researchers learn more about the cancer process. Volunteer blood and specimen donations are crucial to the investigation of biological markers that can help in the development of early detection tests, as well as open the door to finding targets for treatments and preventative cancer therapies.

Help the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center discover new

  • Prevention methods
  • Screening and early detection tests
  • Treatments

If you are at least 40 years old, do not have a history of cancer or an active illness, please consider becoming a blood or specimen donor. The entire process takes about 20 minutes, involves a simple blood draw and filling out a questionnaire. Your identity and any medical information will be kept strictly confidential, and there is minimal risk to you as a donor.

If you would like to become a specimen donor, please let your doctor or medical staff know, or contact the study coordinator through any method below.

Phone: (916) 734-8459
Pager: (916) 762-0345
E-mail: biospecimenstudy@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu

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Volunteer specimen donation: frequently asked questions (FAQ)

lung cancer research

What is a biospecimen collection study?

The study collects any human material such as blood, urine, fluid or tissue and stores the material along with pertinent clinical information for future research purposes. The storage facility is known as a biorepository or biobank and plays a key role in accelerating cancer research.

Why is the study being done?

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The UC Davis Lung Cancer Research Program is striving to better understand the lung cancer process. Researchers are investigating biological markers that may lead to development of clinical tests, therapies for prevention, early detection screening and treatment of lung cancer.

How can I make a difference?

Volunteer blood and specimen donors are a crucial part of lung cancer discovery. Researchers need donor samples to compare between non-cancer and cancer specimens. If you are at least 40 years old, do not have a history of cancer or an active illness, please consider becoming a blood or specimen donor.

lung cancer research

What specimens can I donate?

We would like to collect two tubes (about four teaspoons) of blood from your arm. You also may be asked to give optional specimens and samples, which you can discuss with the study coordinator.

How long will it take?

The entire process takes about 20 minutes and generally involves a simple blood draw and filling out a questionnaire.

Can I stop being in the study?

Yes. This study is completely voluntary, and you may stop your participation at any time.

Will my information be kept confidential?

Yes. No name or any other identifying information will be given out to researchers. The specimen(s) will be labeled with a unique code.

What are the risks and the costs?

The risks to you as a subject are minimal, and your donation does not involve any costs to you or your family.